Allegiant Air execs at controls of flight that landed with low fuel

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Reprinted from the Las Vegas Review Journal.  By Richard N. Velotta.

Two Allegiant Air executives, the vice president of operations and the director of flight safety, were at the controls of the flight that made an emergency landing last week because it was nearly out of fuel.

Greg Baden, Allegiant’s vice president of operations, and Michael Wuerger, director of flight safety, government affairs and quality assurance, were flying Allegiant’s Flight 426 from McCarran International Airport to the Fargo, N.D., Hector International Airport on July 23.

A representative of Allegiant confirmed that Baden and Wuerger were flying the plane, adding it is not uncommon for members of operations management to take flights to maintain their pilot status.

Allegiant said it is cooperating with the Federal Aviation Administration in an investigation of the emergency landing, which was complicated by the closure of the Fargo airport for a practice session of the Navy’s Blue Angels precision flight team, which was preparing for an air show.

Flight 426, with 144 passengers and six crew members on board, left Las Vegas an hour behind schedule and couldn’t reach Fargo before closure of the airspace.

While a transcript of the conversation between the Allegiant cockpit and Fargo’s air traffic control center indicated the twin-engine MD-80 jet was dangerously low on fuel as it approached Fargo, Allegiant officials say the plane had 42 minutes of fuel remaining when it arrived at 1:02 p.m., Central Daylight Time.

The exchange between the plane and the tower, posted Tuesday on the LifeATC.net website, indicated that airline officials were trying to contact the tower by phone to get clearance to land, but were unsuccessful, leading to further conversation once the plane was within range of the Fargo tower.  To read the full transcript of the exchange, click here and here.

This is another in a string of incidents that have plagued Allegiant Air in the last month.  Earlier in July, an Allegiant Air plane was forced to make an emergency landing after take off due to mechanical problems.  This came just a week after one of their planes was unable to take off after sitting on the runway for over an hour.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

9 Terrifying Things That Will Make You Rethink Flying

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Photo by Corbis. Design by Erik Mace for Yahoo Travel

Photo by Corbis. Design by Erik Mace for Yahoo Travel

Reprinted from Yahoo Travel.  By Sid Lipsey.

Well, that doesn’t inspire confidence.

Reports that an air traffic controller was found drunk on the job at Springdale Municipal Airport in Arkansas are sparking everything from disbelief to laughs to references to the 1980s comedy Airplane (“Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit drinkin’,” says a air traffic control character). But for some of us, a bizarre story like this is inspiring a more serious reaction — terror. We’re wondering anew just what the heck we’re getting ourselves into when we get on a plane.

Yes, we all know that, while airplanes are extremely safe, in extremely rare cases things can go wrong. And we all have a pretty good idea of what some of those things are. What’s really scary, though, is the stuff we really don’t consider — like wasted air traffic controllers, for instance. Knowing that kind of potential even exists in the world is just one more thing we have to push out of our minds the next time we get on a plane.

To read the full list, click here.

And don’t be surprised if you see a picture of your pilot on Facebook while he is flying.  Apparently, selfies in the cockpit are a real, and terrifying, reality.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Have you been hit by a beverage cart?

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events

“One minute I was fast asleep and the next thing I knew I was in pain, I was hit by the beverage cart!” We at Brodkowitz Law hear this all too frequently.  Beverage carts, loaded down with ice and drinks, can hurt. So what should you do if you are hit by the beverage (or food) cart on a flight? First- let the flight attendant know that you are injured- and ask for appropriate medical treatment like ice and ibuprofen or Tylenol. Obtain the name of the flight attendant who hit you. Make sure that the flight attendant completes an incident report to document what happened, it is not uncommon for an airline to later deny that you were struck or injured.

If you are unable to walk without discomfort make sure that the cabin crew is aware of this fact in advance of landing and ask them to provide a wheelchair upon landing or to arrange for a paramedic to meet the aircraft to examine you. Your job is to get better. Go to the doctor, explain what happened, this is known as the “mechanism of injury.” Tell your physician what part of the cart struck you (if you know) and where it struck you on your body. Your doctor should be advised that a fully loaded cart can weigh as much as 300 lbs. Your doctor may want to obtain imagining to determine the extent of your injury. Many passengers are struck in the knee with the beverage cart, and sometimes this requires arthroscopic surgery. Continue medical treatment until you fully recover.

Most importantly, protect your rights by calling an attorney who represents injured passengers against airlines as soon as possible.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

7 killed in 2 Monday plane crashes in Minnesota, Wisconsin

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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PIPESTONE COUNTY, Minn. (KMSP) - Seven people were killed in two crashes involving small planes in Minnesota and Wisconsin on Monday, the first crash in Polk County, Wis., the second a few hours later in Pipestone County, Minn. None of the individuals killed in the crashes have been identified.

4 killed in Alden Township, Wis.

Four other people were killed in another small plane crash on Monday night just east of the Minnesota border in Polk County, Wis.

Polk County sheriff’s officials confirmed the small plane crashed near Alden Township, Wis. on Monday around 5:30 p.m., about 30 miles northeast of Hudson.

Witnesses indicated that the single-engine airplane nose-dived and crashed in a field north of 30th Ave. and east of 150th Street.

“Deputies responding found a single engine Beechcraft aircraft burning in the field. When the fire had been extinguished by responding fire units, the remains of 4 occupants were located in the airplane,” Polk County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release.

The Polk County Medical Examiner’s Office, FAA and NTSB are investigating along with the sheriff’s office.

3 killed in Holland, Minn.

Three people died after a small plane went down in a cornfield in southwest Minnesota on Monday night.

Pipestone County sheriff’s officials said the small fixed-wing airplane went down in a corn field south of Holland, Minn. around 8:13 p.m., and first responders located it on a waterway in Grange Township Section 13, about 55 miles northeast of Sioux Falls, S.D. The occupants, a pilot and two passengers, were pronounced dead at the scene.

The Pipestone County Sheriff’s Office and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the incident.

The loss of life in an airplane crash is tragic. Here at Brodkowitz Law we specialize our work representing individuals who were killed or injured while flying.  Visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Fiery Small Plane Crash in Riverside Neighborhood Kills Pilot

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from NBCLosAngeles.com.  By Willian Avila and Joe Studley.

A small plane crashed in a California neighborhood on Sunday, exploding in flames within feet of homes and killing the pilot, officials said.

There were no injuries on the ground or damage to nearby homes, Riverside police said.

“The pilot of a single-engine Beechcraft BE35 reported a loss of engine power before crashing in a residential neighborhood about a half-mile east of Riverside Municipal Airport,” Federal Aviation Administration officials told NBC4.

The pilot, who was the only person on board, had made a request to land at the airport, but in another transmission said he was not going to make it, police said.

The aircraft crash landed in the 400 block of Adams Street, hit the curb, crashed into a home’s chain-link fence and burst into flames, police said.

“(There was) a boom - it actually, literally shook the ground,” said witness Christina Barriento.

Butch Romero, another witness, says he swerved his car to miss the plane as it came down.

“When I jerked it, the plane landed like that and bounced into those people’s yard,” he said.

To read the full story, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Soldotna man, passenger in plane crash

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from the Peninsula Clarion Times.  By Megan Pacer.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating a plane crash after a Soldotna resident and his passenger hiked out from the crash site in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge last week.

Alaska State Troopers were made aware of a downed plane when a pilot reported it to the Rescue Coordination Center in Anchorage after spotting it in the Kenai Mountains near Dinglestadt Glacier on July 19, according to a July 21 dispatch. The pilot had been unable to land and locate the tail number, so troopers responded with search and rescue personnel. Upon locating the tail number and calling the plane’s owner, troopers discovered 24-year-old Joshua Mastre had been flying the plane when it went down in the refuge approximately 25 miles northeast of Homer on July 14.

“Mastre reported he was flying… when he was caught in a strong down draft which caused the plane to crash into the mountain,” the dispatch reads. “He was uninjured and hiked out.”

Mastre did not report the plane crash to the FAA or NTSB, according to the dispatch. Steve Miller, deputy manager at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, said Mastre did report the crash to the refuge days later, after he and an unidentified passenger hiked away from the crash site to meet a float plane.

“They called us a few days after it had gone down in order to recover the aircraft,” Miller said.

Miller said planes cannot be removed from refuge land without a permit, which he said Mastre is in the process of obtaining.

Plane crashes in the refuge are not entirely uncommon, Miller said. Last year, two planes went down and had to be recovered from refuge land.

Miller said, in hindsight, the refuge ought to have notified troopers of the crash, but that refuge personnel were unaware they hadn’t already been called.

Alaska State Trooper Public Information Officer Megan Peters said one reason it took troopers a while to find out about the crash is that they don’t generally consider the refuge as a source of aviation information.

“(Mastre) told somebody,” Peters said. “They self-rescued, which was awesome, (and) while they did call and tell somebody, it wasn’t an agency… that we would normally look at.”

Once troopers made contact with Mastre and determined no one was injured, Peters said their jurisdiction in the case ended.

“Aviation is dealt with on a federal level,” she said.

“Once we determine there’s nobody actually missing, we’re done.”

Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the FAA Pacific Division, said in an email that federal regulations require plane crashes to be reported to the NTSB. He said both the FAA and NTSB will continue investigating the crash.

Attempts to reach Mastre for comment were not successful.

To read the full story, click here.  This story will continue to update.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Small Plane Crashes at Wisconsin Airport, 6 Injured

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from ABC News.  BY AP Staff.

Five people aboard a single-engine airplane are hurt after it crashed while landing at the Experimental Aircraft Association convention in eastern Wisconsin.

EAA spokesman Dick Knapinski says a Piper Malibu went down on a runway at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh shortly before 8 a.m. Wednesday.

Thick black smoke could be seen billowing from the runway. Oshkosh firefighters were at the scene.

The airport was temporarily closed. WLUK-TV reports all runways reopened by noon.

Theda Clark Medical Center spokeswoman Megan Mulholland tells the station one person is in critical condition, one in serious condition and another in fair condition. The two others on board the plane were treated and released from another hospital, along with a bystander who suffered a minor injury trying to help the people on the plane.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Flight Makes Emergency Landing After Passengers Feel Ill

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

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Reprinted from ABC News.  By AP Staff.

A flight from Denver to Los Angeles was diverted to Grand Junction on Wednesday after a number of passengers reported feeling ill.

United Airlines spokeswoman Jennifer Dohm said the crew of the Airbus A320 deployed oxygen masks and decided to land in the western Colorado city.

There were reports of smoke in the cockpit and cabin, but Grand Junction Fire Department spokesman Shawn Montgomery said firefighters saw no smoke when they entered the plane, and that was confirmed by air monitors. All of the passengers were able to walk off the plane, and one person was taken to the hospital for evaluation.

Montgomery said a passenger had a medical problem during the flight, which caused other passengers to become anxious, light-headed and nauseated. He declined to say what the medical problem was.

United Airlines said Flight 447 carried a crew of six and 150 passengers. Passengers were flown to Los Angeles on a different plane Wednesday afternoon.

Jeremy Kissinger, an event coordinator on his way to Los Angeles with his friends for vacation, was sitting in row 37 of the plane when he noticed a passenger who appeared to have passed out several rows in front of him. Flight attendants began attending to the passenger.

“There was an announcement that there was a problem with the air and they were going to drop the masks,” Kissinger said.

Kissinger said everything seemed normal until the oxygen masks came down, adding that he noticed several people heading to the bathrooms as soon as they were able. He did not smell anything out of the ordinary nor experience any illness but said other people in the same general area fell ill.

Firefighters in full gear, including air tanks, boarded the plane and tested the air before the plane was evacuated.

“You do kinda feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere,” Kissinger said of the Grand Junction airport. “There’s a Subway (sandwich shop) and that’s about it.”

To read the full story, click here.

If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Holland man injured in plane crash on beach

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from the Holland Sentinel.  By Staff report

Holland, Mich.

A Holland man was able to safely glide his small airplane to a landing when he lost power near Holland State Park on Sunday, but received minor injuries in the process, according to the Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office.

Steven Stam, 66, was flying his single-engine 1966 Alon A2 fixed-wing plane northward shortly before 7 p.m. Sunday, July 19, when the engine stopped working. He glided to a landing in the dune grass behind Spyglass Condominiums.

This story is will be updated as new information is provided.  To follow, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

4 injured in small plane crash near Henderson

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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UPDATE:  Three of the four men injured in this plane crash have been identified as active-duty military.  To read the full story, click here.  The other man injured was identified as one of the owners of Lumber and Supply Building Inc.  To read his full story, click here.

Reprinted from Fox5Vegas.com.  By Aaron Barker.

HENDERSON, NV (FOX5) -

Four people were injured when a small plane crashed near Henderson on Sunday afternoon, according to officials.

Michelle French, spokeswoman for the City of Henderson, said the crash happened at 1:22 p.m. in a desert area about 3 miles southeast of the Inspirada neighborhood, which is near the intersection of Volunteer Boulevard and Via Inspirada.

According to Ian Gregor, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, the single-engine Piper PA 28 crashed just after taking off from the Henderson Executive Airport.

The aircraft was bound for Southern California, according to the Associated Press.

French said paramedics took four people to University Medical Center for treatment. The Associated Press reported that two of them were badly burned, and the other two had injuries that were not life-threatening.

Gregor said investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA are trying to determine what caused the crash.

To read the full story, including updates, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.