Two injured in Whidbey Island plane crash

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from KOMO News.  By KOMO Staff.

WHIDBEY ISLAND, Wash. — A pilot and passenger were injured Monday night when their small plane crashed into a tree on Whidbey Island.

The Cessna 182, which took off from Monroe, lost power at about 8:12 p.m and slammed into a tree behind a home on the island, according to Ed Wallace with the Island County sheriff’s office.

The pilot and passenger were both thrown from the plane upon impact, Wallace said.

Island County firefighters and sheriff’s deputies arrived at the crash site soon after and transported the victims to Whidbey General Hospital. Wallace didn’t know the extent of their injuries, but said both are expected to survive.

Representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are aware of the crash and will begin an investigation on Tuesday.

To read the full story, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us.

Small plane crashes into Plainville home killing 3

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from the Boston Globe.  By Jennifer Smith and Astead W. Herndon.

PLAINVILLE — A small private plane dropped from the sky Sunday and crashed into the roof of a stately Colonial home here, engulfing the house in flames as the residents ran to safety outside. All three people in the plane were killed.

Federal officials said the aircraft was a Beechcraft BE36 carrying a pilot and two passengers, including a child. The identity of the victims would not be released until their relatives had been notified, officials said.

“It is a miracle that the four occupants [of the house] were able to escape given the extensive damage to their home,” said State Fire Marshal Stephen D. Coan.

The piston-powered plane crashed into the pale yellow, two-story home at 25 Bridle Path at about 5:45 p.m., aviation officials said.

Neighbors said a couple and their two children — identified as the Rice family — lived in the house. Officials did not immediately confirm the name.

Tracy Guerrier, who lives a few houses down from the crash site, said she was sitting in her bedroom when she felt her home shake. She raced outside to see fire and smoke pouring from the other house, she said.

Guerrier, 21, said her younger sister Marjorie goes to King Phillip Regional High School in nearby Wrentham with one of the children living in the Rice home.

“His family is very friendly,” said Marjorie Guerrier. “They’re always rescuing animals.”

Another neighbor, Eric Tekach, who lives two houses from the engulfed home, said the neighborhood was “scared” and “shaken” after the incident but relieved the Rice family escaped safely.

“They’re wonderful people,” Tekach said. “I’m glad they’re safe. It could’ve been a lot worse.”

The three-alarm fire engulfed the large house on the cul-de-sac; fire departments from nearby communities in Southeastern Massachusetts were on the scene early Sunday evening, fire officials said.

Eight or nine fire companies responded, Plainfield Fire Chief Justin Alexander said at the scene.

The plane crashed into the back of the roof, and by midevening crews were breaking down the ravaged top floor of the structure. The fire was extinguished around 8 p.m., but smoke still wafted from the broken windows.

Plainville police brought in lights for the fire department to continue working after dark.

Firefighters excavated the back side of the house, climbing ladders and hoisting water hoses. Charred doors and windows were being thrown out from the second floor. The first level appeared largely undamaged despite the wreckage on the roof.

At 8:30 p.m., firefighters erected a barrier to block the plane’s remains from view.

Firefighters loaded boxes of goods from the burned house and brought them to a barefoot man, who officials said was the homeowner, standing at a residence across the street.

Officials said neighbors heard a plane sputtering before the crash. The family ran outside when they heard the plane strike their house, Alexander said, and fire officials arrived to find them already outside.

Police and emergency medical personnel were also at the scene. State Police dispatched homicide detectives and patrols, joining crime scene technicians and troopers from the fire marshal’s office at the scene, according to State Police spokesman David Procopio.

To read the full story, click here.

The loss of life in an airplane crash is tragic. Here at Brodkowitz Law we specialize our work representing individuals who were killed or injured while flying.  Visit our website or contact us.

Small plane crashes at Hampton Airfield

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from WMUR.com (ABC News).  By Stephanie Woods

NORTH HAMPTON, N.H. —A small plane crashed into a tree Friday evening at Hampton Airfield.

North Hampton fire and police officials say a small plane crashed at approximately 8:21 p.m. Friday in a wooded area off of Cedar Road.

Crews located the plane on a private property near the southeast side of Hampton Airfield. The ultralight aircraft landed in the canopy of a tree about 40 to 50 feet off the ground.

Officials said the male pilot was not injured and was able to climb out of the aircraft using a ladder firefighters provided.

The pilot flew the aircraft in from Kensington and landed at the airfield before taxiing and taking off. That is when officials say the engine stalled and the plane crashed into the tree.

Officials say the aircraft received minor damage and will remain in the tree until the pilot’s insurance company makes arrangements to remove it.

The identity of the pilot is not be released at this time.

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation Bureau of Aeronautics and the FAA are investigating the crash.

This was the second plane crash at Hampton Field in less than two weeks.

On June 14, a plane went down just after takeoff and landed in the nearby woods.  The pilot and passenger both survived, but the pilot was hospitalized.

For more about the story, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us.

NTSB Investigates Sightseeing Plane Crash in Alaska

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Other Events, Safety

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The National Transportation Safety Board is sending a go-team from its Alaska Regional office to investigate a sightseeing plane that crashed near Ketchikan, Alaska.

A float-equipped DeHavilland DHC-3T (Turbine Otter) airplane crashed in an area of steep, mountainous terrain about 25 miles northeast of Ketchikan. According to local authorities, multiple fatalities have been reported.

NTSB investigator Brice Banning is leading the team as investigator-in-charge. Public Affairs Officer Keith Holloway will coordinate media-related activities from Washington, DC.

NTSB Press Release, here.

Additional information via Greg Morrison, CNN.com:

(CNN) A sightseeing plane carrying a pilot and eight cruise ship passengers crashed into a cliff in southeast Alaska, killing everyone on board.

“There are no survivors,” said Promech Air, the plane’s operator.

Because of poor weather conditions, the body recovery process won’t take place until Friday, the Alaska State Troopers said.

The DeHavilland DHC-3T Otter, a floatplane, crashed in steep, mountainous terrain about 25 miles northeast of Ketchikan.

Authorities haven’t determined why it went down.

The plane was on a shore excursion, sold through Holland America Line. A private helicopter pilot reported seeing the plane’s wreckage against a granite rock face, 800 feet above Ella Lake.

“We are incredibly distressed by this situation, and our thoughts and prayers are with those on board the plane and their families,” Holland America said.

The eight passengers were from the MS Westerdam, which left Seattle on Saturday for a seven-day round-trip cruise.

The plane had taken off on a tour of the 2-million-acre Misty Fjords National Monument, accessible only by floatplanes or boats.

“Towering granite cliffs, 1,000-foot waterfalls, lush and remote valleys and serene crystalline lakes make up this incredible landscape,” the airline says in its website.

The names of the victims will be withheld until family members are notified.

“There is nothing I can say that can alleviate the pain and overwhelming sense of loss that we and the loved ones of those affected are feeling,” said Marcus Sessoms, Promech Air’s president. “At this moment, all of us share the pain and anguish of this terrible event.”

Boeing sued over ‘toxic’ plane cabin air

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events

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Reprinted from The Hill.  Be Keith Laing.

Today we cover another story looking into the issue of toxic air on Boeing planes.  As this issue continues to gain momentum, the shift from local area news to national news proves that people are paying attention.  Brodkowitz Law represents the four flight attendants in this case.

A group of flight attendants are suing airplane manufacturer Boeing for allegedly exposing them to “toxic” air inside its planes, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The flight attendants, who worked for Alaska Airlines, are alleging that Boeing knowingly exposed passengers and flight crews to toxic air that was sucked into its planes through the engine by the system that is used to maintain cabin pressure during flights, according to the report.

The paper said the lawsuit, which was filed in Cook County, Ill. Circuit Court, accuses Boeing planes of having defects with its “bleed-air” systems that make the company responsible for health problems that were experienced by the flight attendants.

A lawyer for the flight attendants told the paper that Boeing has had knowledge of the problems with its ventilation systems for years.

“Our focus is on Boeing not fixing a problem they’ve known about for more than 60 years,” Attorney Rainey Booth said. “The risk to any individual passenger might be low on a daily basis, but what we know is, every day people in this country are exposed.”

The lawsuit alleges that flight attendants became sick after a Jan. 12, 2013 Alaska Air flight from Boston to San Diego, according to the report.

The flight attendants contend that toxic fumes began coming into the vents during the flight, which resulted in two of them passing out and one vomiting.

The plane was diverted to Chicago’s O’Haire International Airport when the problems were reported to the pilot.

“I remember walking down the aisle and just gripping the seatbacks because I felt like I was going to fall over,” one of the flight attendants who is a plaintiff in the lawsuit, Vanessa Woods, told the paper.

“The next thing I know, I was on the galley floor, looking up at Faye who was paging for assistance,” she continued. “She was mumbling incoherently into the PA system. It was beyond frightening.”

Boeing declined to comment on the lawsuit on Tuesday, but the company has said previously that research shows that the air in the cabin of its planes is safe to breathe.

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA) union said Tuesday afternoon that is supports the Alaska Airlines employees that filed the lawsuit against Boeing.

“We support our fellow Flight Attendants in their efforts to seek justice after breathing in contaminated air on board the aircraft. Their experience is similar to many others throughout the airline industry who have experienced contaminated air events,” AFA-CWA president at Alaska Airlines, Jeffrey Peterson, said in a statement.

“In fact, AFA has been fighting for cleaner cabin air for decades while the industry has refused to acknowledge the problem,” Peterson continued. “More recently AFA has been supporting research at the University of Washington to create a blood test that will be able to determine if crew members were poisoned so that proper treatment could begin as soon as possible. Our efforts will continue as we push for sensors and filters to be installed in all aircraft as well as changes to future aircraft design to avoid engine bleed air that can become contaminated. AFA’s global efforts to define this problem so it can be fixed will continue until contaminated bleed air has no way into the cabin ever again.”

-This story was last updated at 5:49 p.m.

To read the story and follow it for updates, click here.

If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Flight attendants sue Boeing, claim cabin air can be toxic

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events

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Reprinted from KING 5.  Jake Whittenberg, KING 5 News

Four Alaska Airlines flight attendants are suing The Boeing Company with claims the air ventilation system on its airplanes can sometimes contain toxic fumes.

The lawsuit was filed in Cook County, Illinois, the home of Boeing headquarters. It points to one flight in particular in July 2013. In that instance, the four flight attendants claim they could smell a foul odor the moment they boarded the plane. They say it became so bad after take-off, they began to feel disoriented and nauseous. One of them says she even passed out and required medical attention from a doctor on board. That flight made an emergency landing in Chicago.

The claim points to the “bleed air” design on almost all Boeing aircraft. Air is cycled into the cabin using the airplane engines. But if a seal in an engine leaks, that air can sometimes be exposed to burning engine oil.

“We know Boeing has known about this problem since the 1950’s,” said Rainey Booth, the attorney representing the flight attendants. “This was the primary problem that they had to address with this ‘bleed air’ design. And it’s the problem they’ve fixed now with its newest design the 787.”

The 787 Dreamliner cycles air from outside the airplane.

Boeing isn’t commenting specifically on the lawsuit filed by the flight attendants, but says air on its planes is safe to breathe and “‘research consistently” shows that “cabin air meets health and safety standards and that contaminant levels are generally low.”

One of the flight attendants says her exposure to toxic fumes on that flight in 2013 has left her with long lasting neurological issues including shaking and nausea .

“When I reach for something my hand shakes. Just to be frank, it’s embarrassing,” said flight attendant Vanessa Woods. “I hope it will get better. I have to stop this from happening to one other person.”

To watch the report via KING 5, click here.

Brodkowitz Law represents the four flight attendants in this case.   If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Are toxic fumes leaking into passenger planes?

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes

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Correspondent Tom Costello reports the results of an NBC News investigation into the air quality in passenger planes.

Watch Are toxic fumes leaking into passenger planes?

Following the filing of a lawsuit in Cook County, Illinois, NBC looks into the topic of toxic fumes on passenger planes.

Brodkowitz Law is among the law firms that are currently representing the plaintiffs in this matter.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Lawsuit against Boeing says airplane cabin air can turn toxic

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

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Reprinted from the Chicago Tribune.  

Airplane cabin air can turn toxic, sickening passengers and crew, a problem that’s been alleged for decades in the U.S. and around the world, says a lawsuit filed Monday against Chicago-based aircraft-maker Boeing Co.

Boeing’s “dirty little secret,” as the lawsuit calls it, in one instance led to those flight attendants vomiting and three of them passing out during a coast-to-coast flight that was diverted to Chicago in 2013. They were taken to a Chicago hospital, and two of them never returned to work, according to the plaintiffs’ lawyer.

Attorneys for the flight attendants claim the crew was “poisoned” and that Boeing’s “design defects” and failure to warn anybody about the dangers of toxic cabin air were fraudulent and negligent, and that the company is “knowingly endangering airplane passengers.”

One expert said that such “fume events” are relatively common, likely happening on at least one U.S. flight per day.

However, Boeing over the years has maintained that there is no problem with bleed air, and that contaminants in cabin air remain at safe levels — assertions that it says are backed up by independent studies. On Monday, Boeing declined to comment about the lawsuit.

Chuck Horning, chairman of the aviation maintenance science department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla., said contaminated bleed air can happen, but in his mind it’s not a common occurrence. “Under normal conditions, I would find it hard to believe this would be a problem,” Horning said.

All commercial aircraft models manufactured by Boeing and its rival Airbus of France use bleed-air systems, except for Boeing’s newest model, the 787 Dreamliner. Fume events stem from jet engine oil contaminating the air. Contamination can happen for many reasons, including leaking engine seals, engine malfunctions and overfilling of an oil reservoir, according to the lawsuit.

Inhaling toxic cabin air can cause injuries because chemicals from heated jet engine oil include neurotoxins such as organophosphates, which are used in pesticides and nerve gases, the suit said.

Similar allegations about health effects from bleed-air systems have been made around the world, recently gaining attention in the United Kingdom and Australia, according to published reports.

The lawsuit filed Monday documents how Boeing has been “put on notice” more than 40 times that its aircraft were “unreasonably dangerous” but it failed to fix the problem by installing filters or sensors and alarms that could alert cabin crew of a toxic-fume problem.

“Our focus is on Boeing not fixing a problem they’ve known about for more than 60 years,” Rainey Booth, one of the attorneys for the flight attendants, said in an interview. “The risk to any individual passenger might be low on a daily basis, but what we know is, every day people in this country are exposed.”

Rainey said the flight attendants are seeking unspecified monetary damages, but the suit goes beyond that. “This needs to be fixed,” Rainey said. “This is a very fixable, unnecessary risk.”

Judith Anderson, an industrial hygienist who researches flight attendant health issues for the Association of Flight Attendants union, called using bleed air “a flawed design.”

“You shouldn’t be pulling air off an engine for ventilation air when you know that the engine can leak toxic oil into the air supply — without installing appropriate design measures to prevent the breathing air from being contaminated,” Anderson said. “It doesn’t make sense.”

According to the lawsuit:

The Alaska Airlines flight attendants are suing over an incident on July 12, 2013, when they were part of the crew on a relatively new Boeing model 737 — manufactured in 2012 — on a flight from Boston to San Diego. They noticed an unpleasant smell in the cabin, and Woods soon began feeling sick and eventually passed out. Neben told the flight captain that fumes were coming from the vents and that her throat was burning, and she was not feeling well. Oskardottir then said she didn’t feel well, fainted and vomited. Two passengers with medical training tried to help. Then Ramirez and Neben got sick.

“I remember walking down the aisle and just gripping the seatbacks because I felt like I was going to fall over,” Woods said in an interview. “The next thing I know, I was on the galley floor, looking up at Faye who was paging for assistance. She was mumbling incoherently into the PA system.

To read the entire story from the Chicago Tribune, click here.
Brodkowitz Law is among the law firms representing these four flight attendants.  If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.
For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Small airplane crash kills pilot

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from the Shreveport Times.

A pilot died when a small plane he was flying crashed in Shreveport Friday.

Shreveport firefighters arrived at Shreveport Downtown Airport at about 5:20 p.m. to find a single-engine Cessna had crashed. More than a dozen units responded to the call.

The pilot — the only one on board — was dead by that time and was not immediately identified. Shreveport Fire Chief Scott Wolverton said the pilot was a man between the ages of 50 and 60.

“There’s a lot of heavy damage to the aircraft. Just from the background we know, he’d been out doing touch-and-goes for several hours here at the Downtown Airport,”Wolverton said. “The individual in the tower did witness the event. As of right now, that’s the only witness we do have.”

The runway was closed so the Federal Aviation Administration could investigate the crash.

The pilot’s name won’t be released until the investigation is complete, officials said. An autopsy will help determine if the pilot’s death was health-related or caused by the crash itself.

To read the full story, click here.

The loss of life in an airplane crash is tragic. Here at Brodkowitz Law we specialize our work representing individuals who were killed or injured while flying.  Visit our website or contact us.

Allegiant Air cancels six flights after mechanical problems

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Reprinted from ABCACTIONNEWS.COM.  By Jarrod Holbrook

Blog note: In a follow up story from the story published earlier today in the Tampa Bay Times, Allegiant Air has made the decision to cancel flights after mechanical problems led to two of their planes requiring and emergency landing in June.  The story below.

Allegiant Airlines canceled six flights Thursday from St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport.
The news comes after Wednesday’s emergency landing and our I-Team’s investigation into mechanical problems with their planes.

Allegiant Air officials tell us because of the emergency landing, and planes out of service due to mechanical problems, the company had no choice but to cancel the six flights. It was the second emergency landing at St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport this month.

Just last week passengers had to use the emergency slides to evacuate on the runway after reports of smelling smoke in the cabin. Passengers on a flight in Idaho last week had to evacuate onto the wing of the plane after more reports of smelling smoke and jet fuel.

The I-Team first told you about a new list of complaints from Allegiant pilots sent to company shareholders during their ongoing labor dispute. In another report, pilots identified 65 cases from last September to March in which flights were diverted, returned, or canceled due to mechanical problems.

The pilots also say mechanics are inexperienced with Allegiant planes and more than half have less than four years of Allegiant experience. That information makes some passengers feel unsafe.

“Usually I don’t worry about things like this. I’m worried about it now!” says one passenger. Another tells us, “There was one time I was about to board on an Allegiant flight and it was canceled because the towers saw flames coming out of the engines.”

Company shareholders met Thursday in Las Vegas at Allegiant’s headquarters. Before the meeting, pilots sent a letter to their board of directors warning them Allegiant Air is “on a dangerous path.”

The FAA claims it has and continues to investigate Allegiant Air’s mechanical problems. Allegiant Air continues to defend its safety record. The company says pilots are using scare tactics because they’re in the middle of a heated labor dispute. It’s apologizing to customers about the delays and maintaining safety is its number one priority.

To read the story, along with the statement issued by Allegiant Air, click here.

Also, click here to read a story about safety concerns raised by Allegiant Air pilots.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us.