Burning smell onboard United Boeing 757

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events

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Original story by Simon Hradecky on The Aviation Herald.

A United Boeing 757-300, registration N75851 performing flight UA-1181 from Los Angeles,CA to Washington Dulles,DC (USA) with 199 passengers and 7 crew, was climbing through FL280 out of Los Angeles when the crew aborted the climb due to a burning odour on board, turned around and diverted to Ontario,CA (USA) for a safe landing about 16 minutes later.

A replacement Boeing 737-900 registration N37464 reached Washington with a delay of 6 hours.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/UAL1181/history/20150129/1610Z/KLAX/KIAD

Find the original story here.

If you have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events. Bring this document to your doctor.

At Brodkowitz Law we have experience representing passengers and flight crew injured by contaminated air on airplanes, for more information, visit our website or contact us.

Two injured after tug jackknifed into Skywest plane at Chicago

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Original story by Simon Hradecky on The Aviation Herald.

A Skywest Canadair CRJ-700 on behalf of United, registration N784SK performing flight OO-6277/UA-6277 from Monterrey (Mexico) to Chicago,IL (USA), had safely landed in Chicago and was being towed to the gate when the tug “jack-knifed” into the aircraft’s fuselage.

The FAA reported the 2 occupants on the tug received injuries of unknown degree.

Read the original article here.

For more information on Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us.

Severe turbulence causes injuries on Canadian flight on Jan. 18th 2015

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety, Turbulence

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Original story by Simon Hradecky on The Aviation Herald.

An Air Georgian Beech 1900D, registration C-GAAR performing flight ZX-7226 from Cranbrook,BC to Calgary,AB (Canada) with 12 passengers and 2 crew, was descending through 14,000 feet towards Calgary when the aircraft encountered severe turbulence causing minor injuries to one of the flight crew. The aircraft continued for a safe landing in Calgary.

The Canadian TSB reported one flight crew member received minor injuries, the aircraft received damage.

Read the original story on The Aviation Herald.

For more information on Brodkowitz Law and our work representing aviation employees and passengers worldwide, visit our website or contact us.

Unknown odor reported on JetBlue flight, required emergency landing

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events

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Original story by Simon Hradecky on The Aviation Herald

A Jetblue Embraer ERJ-190, registration N306JB performing flight B6-1534 from Tampa,FL to Hartford,CT (USA) with 93 people on board, was enroute at FL370 about 210nm southeast of Norfolk,VA (USA) when the crew reported an unknown odor in the cockpit and diverted to Norfolk for a safe landing on runway 23 about 40 minutes later. Emergency services did not find any traces of fire, heat or smoke.

The occurrence aircraft was able to continue the flight after about 6:15 hours on the ground and reached Hartford with a delay of 7:15 hours.

For the full story, click here.

If you have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events. Bring this document to your doctor.

For more information, visit Brodkowitzlaw.com or contact us.

Cabin depressurized due to tailstrike on Southwest flight

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Original story by Simon Hradecky on The Aviation Herald

A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-800, registration N8630B performing flight WN-404 from Milwaukee,WI to Phoenix,AZ (USA) with 155 passengers and 6 crew, was climbing out Milwaukee’s runway 19R when the crew stopped the climb at FL100 suspecting the aircraft had suffered a tail strike on departure, depressurized the cabin and returned to Milwaukee for a safe landing on Milwaukee’s runway 01R about 65 minutes after departure.

Following checks the aircraft was able to depart again after about 3:40 hours on the ground and reached Phoenix with a delay of 4.5 hours.
The airline reported the aircraft experienced a tail strike on takeoff from Milwaukee. The aircraft was inspected with no damage found and was released to service again.


http://flightaware.com/live/flight/SWA404/history/20150113/1250Z/KMKE/KPHX

Read more here.

For more information on Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us.

Cabin smoke forces United Airlines flight to return to Newark

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events, Safety

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Original Story By Larry Higgs | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

United Airlines flight bound for London with 84 people on board had to return to Newark Liberty international airport Wednesday morning after the pilot reported smoke in the cabin.

The flight, United 922 to Heathrow Airport, left from Newark airport and returned at 10:41 a.m., after the smoke condition was reported, said Federal Aviation Administration officials. The FAA is investigating what caused the smoke issue in the Boeing 767 airliner.

Port Authority of New York and New Jersey officials said the plane returned without incident. FAA officials said the smoke was initially reported in the passenger cabin.

Larry Higgs may be reached at lhiggs@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @commutinglarry. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

Original source, here.

If you have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events. Bring this document to your doctor.

For more information, visit Brodkowitzlaw.com or contact us.

LoganAir jet skids off runway as nose gear collapsed on takeoff

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Safety

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Original post via Simon Hradecky, The Aviation Herald

A Loganair Saab 340B on behalf of Flybe, registration G-LGNL performing flight BE-6821 from Stornoway to Glasgow,SC (UK) with 25 passengers and 3 crew, was accelerating for takeoff from Stornoway’s runway 18 at about 08:33L (08:33Z) when the aircraft veered left off the runway and came to a stop on soft ground with the nose gear collapsed. Two passengers were taken to a hospital with minor injuries, two other passengers reported minor injuries, too, but declined assistance.

The British AAIB have dispatched investigators on site and opened an investigation.

The airport confirmed the outgoing aircraft operated by Loganair went off the runway at about 08:33L. Efforts to move the aircraft off the runway area are under way in order to resume normal airport operations later the day.

The flight was cancelled.

The aircraft off the runway (Photo: Donald J MacDonald):
The aircraft off the runway (Photo: Donald J MacDonald)

Map (Graphics: AVH/Google Earth):
Map (Graphics: AVH/Google Earth)

Read the original story here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us.

Delta B752 near Detroit on Jan 8th 2015, smoke in cabin

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events, Safety

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Original post via Simon Hradecky, The Aviation Herald

A Delta Airlines Boeing 757-200, registration N713TW performing flight DL-2275 from New York JFK,NY to Salt Lake City,UT (USA), was enroute at FL380 about 100nm northeast of Detroit,MI (USA) when the crew decided to divert to Detroit reporting smell of smoke in the cabin. The aircraft landed safely on Detroit’s runway 21L about 22 minutes later.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/DAL2275/history/20150108/1430Z/KJFK/KSLC

Read the original story here.

At Brodkowitz Law we have experience representing passengers and flight crew injured by contaminated air on airplanes, for more information, visit our website or contact us.

Press Release – FAA Final Rule Requires Safety Management System for Airlines

Author: admin  |  Category: Safety

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For Immediate Release

January 7, 2015
Contact: Alison Duquette or Les Dorr
Phone: (202) 267-3883

Rule Advances U.S. Airline Industry’s Proactive Safety Culture

WASHINGTON – To reach the next level of safety, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today issued a final rule that requires most U.S. commercial airlines to have Safety Management Systems (SMS) in place by 2018. The rule builds on the programs many airlines already use to identify and reduce aviation risk.

SMS is the formal, top-down, organization-wide approach to managing safety risk and assuring the effectiveness of safety risk controls. SMS gives airlines a set of business processes and management tools to examine data gathered from everyday operations, isolate trends that may be precursors to incidents or accidents, take steps to mitigate the risk, and verify the effectiveness of the program. SMS requires compliance with technical standards but also promotes a safety culture to improve the overall performance of the organization. It uses four key components – safety policy, safety risk management, safety assurance, and safety promotion.

“Aviation is incredibly safe, but continued growth means that we must be proactive and smart about how we use safety data to detect and mitigate risk,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “SMS gives airlines the tools they need to further reduce risk in commercial aviation.”

The rule requires airlines to implement a safety management system within three years. They must submit their implementation plans to the FAA within six months. The rule also requires a single accountable executive to oversee SMS. An SMS defines “what” is expected rather than “how” the requirement is to be met. This allows each air carrier to design an SMS to match the size, complexity and business model of its organization. An SMS does not take the place of regular FAA oversight, inspection and audits to ensure compliance with regulations.

“Our commercial aviation industry is a world-leader and model for risk mitigation and I’m proud that so many airlines have embraced the SMS culture voluntarily. Now the FAA and the air carrier industry are taking the next step,” said FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta. “The FAA’s workforce also is transitioning to a proactive, risk-based culture so we can effectively target our resources.”

The aviation industry and federal government reduced the fatality risk in U.S. commercial air travel by 83 percent between 1998 and 2008. The industry and government now share a goal to reduce the U.S. commercial fatality risk by 50 percent from 2010 to 2025.

“Our members are fierce competitors, but we do not compete on safety because we know it is our most important job, and there is nothing more important than the safe arrival of our passengers, crew and cargo,” said A4A President and CEO Nicholas E. Calio. “That is why our members adopted this approach long before it became a rule; our work is a driving force as to why the U.S. industry is the model for the world in aviation safety.”

The Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010 mandated that the FAA develop a rule requiring all Part 121 operators to implement SMS. The rule is consistent with the International Civil Aviation Organization’s standards and responds to National Transportation Safety Board recommendations.

The FAA estimates the rule will cost the airlines $224.3 million over 10 years ($135.1 million present value). The agency estimates the benefits will range from $205 million to $472.3 million over 10 years ($104.9 to $241.9 million present value). The FAA is offering a federally developed and funded software system to help airlines implement SMS. The system will cost the FAA $2.6 million per year to maintain.

The final rule will be effective within 60 days once it’s published in the Federal Register. More information is available on FAA.gov and the FAA’s SMS Office website.

FAA Internal Report Finds Pilots in Philly US Airways Crash Didn’t Properly Set Flight Computer

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Other Events, Safety

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Original Story via Vince Lattanzio and Harry Hairston @ NBCPhilidelphia.com

The pilots behind the controls of a US Airways flight that crashed at Philadelphia International Airport in March failed to properly prepare the aircraft for takeoff, a Federal Aviation Administration report obtained by NBC10 concluded. Officials also found the plane’s captain had prescription drugs in his system that should have disqualified him from flying.

Initial findings by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) blamed the crash on wind sheer, but the internal FAA report points to pilot error.

The incident report, provided to NBC10 Investigative Reporter Harry Hairston through a Freedom of Information request, states the flight crew of US Airways flight 1702 did not enter velocity speeds needed for departure into the Airbus A320’s flight computer.

Once the pilot throttled up for takeoff along Runway 27 Left on March 13, an alarm sounded warning that cockpit levers were not set, the report said. The co-pilot relayed part of a written message prompting the pilot to move the levers to the “Take Off Go Around” position, according to the report.

However, the pilot only put the throttle in the Flexible Take-Off position and once the jet reached a speed of 92 mph, another alarm sounded warning the crew to move the engines into an Idle position, the report said. This is used during landing.

According to the report, the captain asked his co-pilot whether she had ever heard such an alarm on takeoff before. She answered “No.”

Despite the alarms, the crew continued with takeoff.

“We’ll get that straight when we get airborne,” officials quoted the pilot as saying.

The Fort Lauderdale, Florida-bound airliner, carrying 149 passengers and five crew, reached a speed of about 183 mph and 70 feet off the ground when the pilot felt “the aircraft was unsafe to fly,” the report stated.

He moved the throttle into the Idle position and the plane’s tail smashed into the runway, followed by the middle landing gear, the report said. The hard landing forced the plane’s nose into the ground, causing the landing gear to collapse and sent the jet skidding 2,000 feet across a grass field.

As it was sliding, the plane’s left engine sucked up runway lights and dirt causing it to smoke as passengers ran away to safety. Two passengers suffered minor injuries and had to be taken to the hospital.

“They should have never commenced to take off,” aviation expert Arthur Wolk said after reviewing the report with the NBC10 Investigators. “When they applied takeoff power, they got warnings the system was not properly set and the information they needed was not there.”

“That could have been a horribly fatal accident,” he added.

The report also says that the plane’s captain should not have even walked into the cockpit.

He underwent a stress test two days before the crash and was given two drugs — the sedative Midazolam and narcotic Fentanyl, the report said.

Based on how the body processes these drugs, the pilot would not be fit to fly until 60 hours after taking them. He returned 45 hours later and did not inform US Airways about his condition, officials said.

“These drugs have the ability impair one’s attention and now we have an incident that relates to one’s failure to attend to the business at hand which was to make sure the airplane was properly configure for taken off,” Wolk said.

A US Airways spokesperson declined to comment until the NTSB finishes its investigation.

The internal FAA report will be provided to the NTSB and a final report is expected to be released in Spring 2015.

Read more: http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/FAA-Internal-Report-Finds-Pilots-in-Philly-US-Airways-Crash-Didnt-Properly-Set-Flight-Computer-287248391.html#ixzz3OBDd4c8m

For more information on Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us.