British Airways Jet Catches Fire at Las Vegas Airport; 20 Injured

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Fumes, Other Events, Safety

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Via NBCnews.com

Original story by , and

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the engine failure that caused an intense fire on a British Airways Boeing 777 as it prepared for takeoff in Las Vegas, sending 20 passengers to the hospital.

Passengers used inflatable slides to escape the blaze on Tuesday afternoon at McCarran International Airport, just before the plane was to embark on a 10-hour flight to London Gatwick.

Thick clouds of black smoke billowed from the left engine of the plane as the passengers scurried across the tarmac. Witnesses said the fire was so intense that it melted windows on the plane.

Sunrise Hospital said it treated 20 patients. The airline said Wednesday that everyone had been released. It also pledged its cooperation with the NTSB.

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photo via Twitter: https://twitter.com/SuaveCastro

Cockpit alarms could be heard on recordings of the pilots’ mayday call to air traffic controllers.

The Boeing 777 experienced an engine failure after being cleared for takeoff at around 4:13 p.m. (7:13 p.m. ET) at McCarran International Airport, the airport said.

Full story, via NBC News here.

We will update this blog with preliminary Information from the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration, as it becomes available.

Additional details can be found, here.

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Rough landing: ‘I remember just thinking, this is it,’ says passenger

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Other Events, Safety

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Washington (CNN) For a minute, Christine Malloy was very worried. As a frequent flier, she was used to rough landings once in a while. But Malloy could tell this landing was different.

“Within seconds, the plane dropped to the ground,” she told CNN on Wednesday. “And it dropped really hard.”

Malloy was one of 159 passengers and crew aboard American Airlines/US Airways Flight 1851 flying Saturday from Atlanta to North Carolina’s Charlotte Douglas International Airport.

As the Airbus A321 nearly touched down on the runway, the jetliner hit several runway lights, according to the FAA.

“I remember just thinking, this is it.” she said. “I tightened my seat belt and I just grabbed on to the seat really hard.”

“Things were really chaotic,” she said. “We had people screaming. There were things kind of flying around in the air.”

Malloy and a fellow passenger comforted each other for a brief moment. “We put our hands through the seat and we held hands,” she remembered. “I just said a prayer and held on really tight.”

Then Malloy said she could feel the plane gain altitude as the pilot aborted the landing.

She wondered, “What’s going on here, right? Is it the weather? Is it the pilot?”

Minutes later, the plane landed safely on its second try. No injuries were reported, American Airlines the parent company of US Airways, said in a statement to CNN.

The flight crew was performing what’s called a “go-around,” lining up the aircraft for another landing.

Go-arounds are standard safety procedures that pilots use during approach when airliners aren’t lined up properly for landing. They abort the landing and “go around” to set up for another attempt.

The flight crew blamed wind shear for the aborted landing, according to the FAA. Wind shear is a weather phenomenon that results in a sudden downward burst of wind just before landing.

Since 1943, 87 airline, military and business jet incidents have been blamed on wind shear and downdrafts, according to Aviation Week and the Flight Safety Foundation.

In the 1970s and ’80s, deadly wind shear crashes led to better flight training and robust radar technology that have helped pilots avoid this dangerous weather phenomenon.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating Saturday’s incident and are examining weather conditions, in addition to the airliner’s cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder.

The airline said the captain discovered damage to the underside of the aircraft. Workers found debris and damaged lights on the runway, according to the FAA, prompting the temporary closure of the runway.

The plane has been taken out of service, the airline said.

Original story, here.

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Pilot identified in plane crash on approach to Harbor Springs airport

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from petoskeynews.com. By Matt Mikus.

Authorities have confirmed the male pilot of a small private plane is dead after the aircraft crashed near the Harbor Springs airport overnight.

The plane, a Piper Cherokee, was discovered by an employee at Emmet Brick and Block around 7:30 a.m. Monday, Emmet County Sheriff Pete Wallin said. Authorities believe the plane crashed on approach to the Harbor Springs airport Sunday around 11 p.m.

The male pilot, Authur A. Green III, 58, of Farmington Hills, was the only person on board the plane, according to Wallin. Green served as a First Lieutenant with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division.

DNR officials said in a release that Green was headed to a meeting of the DNR Law Enforcement Division.

Green served as the supervisor for District 9 of the Department of Natural Resources, which covered Wayne, Oakland, Monroe, Genesee, Lapeer, Macomb and St. Clair counties.

“First Lieutenant Green’s death is a profound loss for the DNR and for the citizens of the state,” said DNR Law Enforcement Chief Gary Hagler. “He was a dedicated professional who was deeply committed to protecting our nation, its citizens and Michigan’s natural resources. Green was instrumental in the smooth transition of Belle Isle Park in Detroit to DNR management. He will be greatly missed.”

To read the full story, including any updates, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Four people injured in plane crash at Georgetown-Scott County Airport

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from wkyt.com.  By: Garrett Wymer, Sean Moody.

GEORGETOWN, Ky. (WKYT) - Four Somerset men survived the crash-landing of a twin-engine turboprop at the Georgetown-Scott County Regional Airport Saturday evening.

Scott County Sheriff Tony Hampton said Mark Conrad was piloting the Beechcraft King Air. The sheriff said Conrad’s son, Aaron was on board as well as Ron Absher and his son, Jonathan Absher. A family friend said the four were coming back from a fishing trip to Canada. They were flying a leg from Dayton to their home in Somerset when the plane ran into trouble.

“There was some type of engine failure. Just basically lost control after a certain point. It was still flying on one engine and then I guess he lost power to the second engine,” said Georgetown/Scott County Emergency Management Agency and Office of Homeland Security Director Jack Donovan.

The airplane’s flight path according to FlightAware.com showed Conrad divert to the nearby Georgetown-Scott County Regional Airport. Donovan said Conrad was able to get word to air traffic control that they would try an emergency landing there. That led to a quick EMS response to the airport.

To read the full story, including any updates, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

7 killed in 2 Monday plane crashes in Minnesota, Wisconsin

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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PIPESTONE COUNTY, Minn. (KMSP) - Seven people were killed in two crashes involving small planes in Minnesota and Wisconsin on Monday, the first crash in Polk County, Wis., the second a few hours later in Pipestone County, Minn. None of the individuals killed in the crashes have been identified.

4 killed in Alden Township, Wis.

Four other people were killed in another small plane crash on Monday night just east of the Minnesota border in Polk County, Wis.

Polk County sheriff’s officials confirmed the small plane crashed near Alden Township, Wis. on Monday around 5:30 p.m., about 30 miles northeast of Hudson.

Witnesses indicated that the single-engine airplane nose-dived and crashed in a field north of 30th Ave. and east of 150th Street.

“Deputies responding found a single engine Beechcraft aircraft burning in the field. When the fire had been extinguished by responding fire units, the remains of 4 occupants were located in the airplane,” Polk County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release.

The Polk County Medical Examiner’s Office, FAA and NTSB are investigating along with the sheriff’s office.

3 killed in Holland, Minn.

Three people died after a small plane went down in a cornfield in southwest Minnesota on Monday night.

Pipestone County sheriff’s officials said the small fixed-wing airplane went down in a corn field south of Holland, Minn. around 8:13 p.m., and first responders located it on a waterway in Grange Township Section 13, about 55 miles northeast of Sioux Falls, S.D. The occupants, a pilot and two passengers, were pronounced dead at the scene.

The Pipestone County Sheriff’s Office and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the incident.

The loss of life in an airplane crash is tragic. Here at Brodkowitz Law we specialize our work representing individuals who were killed or injured while flying.  Visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Fiery Small Plane Crash in Riverside Neighborhood Kills Pilot

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from NBCLosAngeles.com.  By Willian Avila and Joe Studley.

A small plane crashed in a California neighborhood on Sunday, exploding in flames within feet of homes and killing the pilot, officials said.

There were no injuries on the ground or damage to nearby homes, Riverside police said.

“The pilot of a single-engine Beechcraft BE35 reported a loss of engine power before crashing in a residential neighborhood about a half-mile east of Riverside Municipal Airport,” Federal Aviation Administration officials told NBC4.

The pilot, who was the only person on board, had made a request to land at the airport, but in another transmission said he was not going to make it, police said.

The aircraft crash landed in the 400 block of Adams Street, hit the curb, crashed into a home’s chain-link fence and burst into flames, police said.

“(There was) a boom - it actually, literally shook the ground,” said witness Christina Barriento.

Butch Romero, another witness, says he swerved his car to miss the plane as it came down.

“When I jerked it, the plane landed like that and bounced into those people’s yard,” he said.

To read the full story, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Soldotna man, passenger in plane crash

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from the Peninsula Clarion Times.  By Megan Pacer.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating a plane crash after a Soldotna resident and his passenger hiked out from the crash site in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge last week.

Alaska State Troopers were made aware of a downed plane when a pilot reported it to the Rescue Coordination Center in Anchorage after spotting it in the Kenai Mountains near Dinglestadt Glacier on July 19, according to a July 21 dispatch. The pilot had been unable to land and locate the tail number, so troopers responded with search and rescue personnel. Upon locating the tail number and calling the plane’s owner, troopers discovered 24-year-old Joshua Mastre had been flying the plane when it went down in the refuge approximately 25 miles northeast of Homer on July 14.

“Mastre reported he was flying… when he was caught in a strong down draft which caused the plane to crash into the mountain,” the dispatch reads. “He was uninjured and hiked out.”

Mastre did not report the plane crash to the FAA or NTSB, according to the dispatch. Steve Miller, deputy manager at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, said Mastre did report the crash to the refuge days later, after he and an unidentified passenger hiked away from the crash site to meet a float plane.

“They called us a few days after it had gone down in order to recover the aircraft,” Miller said.

Miller said planes cannot be removed from refuge land without a permit, which he said Mastre is in the process of obtaining.

Plane crashes in the refuge are not entirely uncommon, Miller said. Last year, two planes went down and had to be recovered from refuge land.

Miller said, in hindsight, the refuge ought to have notified troopers of the crash, but that refuge personnel were unaware they hadn’t already been called.

Alaska State Trooper Public Information Officer Megan Peters said one reason it took troopers a while to find out about the crash is that they don’t generally consider the refuge as a source of aviation information.

“(Mastre) told somebody,” Peters said. “They self-rescued, which was awesome, (and) while they did call and tell somebody, it wasn’t an agency… that we would normally look at.”

Once troopers made contact with Mastre and determined no one was injured, Peters said their jurisdiction in the case ended.

“Aviation is dealt with on a federal level,” she said.

“Once we determine there’s nobody actually missing, we’re done.”

Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the FAA Pacific Division, said in an email that federal regulations require plane crashes to be reported to the NTSB. He said both the FAA and NTSB will continue investigating the crash.

Attempts to reach Mastre for comment were not successful.

To read the full story, click here.  This story will continue to update.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Small Plane Crashes at Wisconsin Airport, 6 Injured

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from ABC News.  BY AP Staff.

Five people aboard a single-engine airplane are hurt after it crashed while landing at the Experimental Aircraft Association convention in eastern Wisconsin.

EAA spokesman Dick Knapinski says a Piper Malibu went down on a runway at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh shortly before 8 a.m. Wednesday.

Thick black smoke could be seen billowing from the runway. Oshkosh firefighters were at the scene.

The airport was temporarily closed. WLUK-TV reports all runways reopened by noon.

Theda Clark Medical Center spokeswoman Megan Mulholland tells the station one person is in critical condition, one in serious condition and another in fair condition. The two others on board the plane were treated and released from another hospital, along with a bystander who suffered a minor injury trying to help the people on the plane.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Holland man injured in plane crash on beach

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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Reprinted from the Holland Sentinel.  By Staff report

Holland, Mich.

A Holland man was able to safely glide his small airplane to a landing when he lost power near Holland State Park on Sunday, but received minor injuries in the process, according to the Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office.

Steven Stam, 66, was flying his single-engine 1966 Alon A2 fixed-wing plane northward shortly before 7 p.m. Sunday, July 19, when the engine stopped working. He glided to a landing in the dune grass behind Spyglass Condominiums.

This story is will be updated as new information is provided.  To follow, click here.

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4 injured in small plane crash near Henderson

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes

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UPDATE:  Three of the four men injured in this plane crash have been identified as active-duty military.  To read the full story, click here.  The other man injured was identified as one of the owners of Lumber and Supply Building Inc.  To read his full story, click here.

Reprinted from Fox5Vegas.com.  By Aaron Barker.

HENDERSON, NV (FOX5) -

Four people were injured when a small plane crashed near Henderson on Sunday afternoon, according to officials.

Michelle French, spokeswoman for the City of Henderson, said the crash happened at 1:22 p.m. in a desert area about 3 miles southeast of the Inspirada neighborhood, which is near the intersection of Volunteer Boulevard and Via Inspirada.

According to Ian Gregor, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, the single-engine Piper PA 28 crashed just after taking off from the Henderson Executive Airport.

The aircraft was bound for Southern California, according to the Associated Press.

French said paramedics took four people to University Medical Center for treatment. The Associated Press reported that two of them were badly burned, and the other two had injuries that were not life-threatening.

Gregor said investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA are trying to determine what caused the crash.

To read the full story, including updates, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.