Scandinavian Airlines Flight SK-995 Engine Bleed Problem during Flight

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

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Scandinavian Airlines Flight SK-995 was heading towards Beijing when its flight was abruptly reverted back to Copenhagen, its place of departure.

The Airbus A340-300 was approaching cruising altitude when the flight crew noticed an engine bleed problem with the plane.

The crew decided to return back to Copenhagen and landed, effectively canceling the flight. The aircraft was later serviced 38 hours after the incident.

An article on this event can be found here.

For more information about Friedman | Rubin’s aviation practice and our work representing flight attendants, commercial airline passengers, pilots, plane and helicopter crash victims, visit our website.

Friedman | Rubin serves clients nationally and internationally. We have the aviation law experience and resources to help you win your case. Call toll free 1-888-359-5298 for a free no obligation review of your case. You may also fill out an Online Consultation Form.

American Airlines 319 Emergency Landing at Clinton National Airport

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events, Safety

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American Airlines Flight 319 traveling from Chicago toward Los Angeles experienced smoke in both the cabin and the cockpit.

In response the flight diverted to Clinton National Airport in Little Rock, Arkansas, conducting an emergency landing.

On board were 122 passengers and 5 crew members.

For more information about Friedman | Rubin’s aviation practice and our work representing flight attendants, commercial airline passengers, pilots, plane and helicopter crash victims, visit our website.

Friedman | Rubin serves clients nationally and internationally. We have the aviation law experience and resources to help you win your case. Call toll free 1-888-359-5298 for a free no obligation review of your case. You may also fill out an Online Consultation Form.

American Airlines Flight 1134 makes Emergency Landing due to Odor

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes

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On Monday morning an American Airlines flight heading towards Los Angeles International Airport made an emergency landing at Clinton National Airport, Arkansas.

The American Airlines Flight 1134 diverted from its original flight path after passengers reported smelling strange odors in the cabin.

On board the flight were actors Jamie Bell and Kate Mara who later tweeted their vehement disapproval with the flight. In particular, Mara voiced Flight 1134 “was unacceptable” and “[a] disgraceful, pathetic way to treat families traveling with infants and elderly.”

For more information about Friedman | Rubin’s aviation practice and our work representing flight attendants, commercial airline passengers, pilots, plane and helicopter crash victims, visit our website.

Friedman | Rubin serves clients nationally and internationally. We have the aviation law experience and resources to help you win your case. Call toll free 1-888-359-5298 for a free no obligation review of your case. You may also fill out an Online Consultation Form.

British Airways Jet Catches Fire at Las Vegas Airport; 20 Injured

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Fumes, Other Events, Safety

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Via NBCnews.com

Original story by , and

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the engine failure that caused an intense fire on a British Airways Boeing 777 as it prepared for takeoff in Las Vegas, sending 20 passengers to the hospital.

Passengers used inflatable slides to escape the blaze on Tuesday afternoon at McCarran International Airport, just before the plane was to embark on a 10-hour flight to London Gatwick.

Thick clouds of black smoke billowed from the left engine of the plane as the passengers scurried across the tarmac. Witnesses said the fire was so intense that it melted windows on the plane.

Sunrise Hospital said it treated 20 patients. The airline said Wednesday that everyone had been released. It also pledged its cooperation with the NTSB.

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photo via Twitter: https://twitter.com/SuaveCastro

Cockpit alarms could be heard on recordings of the pilots’ mayday call to air traffic controllers.

The Boeing 777 experienced an engine failure after being cleared for takeoff at around 4:13 p.m. (7:13 p.m. ET) at McCarran International Airport, the airport said.

Full story, via NBC News here.

We will update this blog with preliminary Information from the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration, as it becomes available.

Additional details can be found, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law’s aviation practice and our work representing plane crash victims, commercial airline passengers, pilots, flight attendants and helicopter crash victims, visit our website or contact us.

Flight Makes Emergency Landing After Passengers Feel Ill

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

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Reprinted from ABC News.  By AP Staff.

A flight from Denver to Los Angeles was diverted to Grand Junction on Wednesday after a number of passengers reported feeling ill.

United Airlines spokeswoman Jennifer Dohm said the crew of the Airbus A320 deployed oxygen masks and decided to land in the western Colorado city.

There were reports of smoke in the cockpit and cabin, but Grand Junction Fire Department spokesman Shawn Montgomery said firefighters saw no smoke when they entered the plane, and that was confirmed by air monitors. All of the passengers were able to walk off the plane, and one person was taken to the hospital for evaluation.

Montgomery said a passenger had a medical problem during the flight, which caused other passengers to become anxious, light-headed and nauseated. He declined to say what the medical problem was.

United Airlines said Flight 447 carried a crew of six and 150 passengers. Passengers were flown to Los Angeles on a different plane Wednesday afternoon.

Jeremy Kissinger, an event coordinator on his way to Los Angeles with his friends for vacation, was sitting in row 37 of the plane when he noticed a passenger who appeared to have passed out several rows in front of him. Flight attendants began attending to the passenger.

“There was an announcement that there was a problem with the air and they were going to drop the masks,” Kissinger said.

Kissinger said everything seemed normal until the oxygen masks came down, adding that he noticed several people heading to the bathrooms as soon as they were able. He did not smell anything out of the ordinary nor experience any illness but said other people in the same general area fell ill.

Firefighters in full gear, including air tanks, boarded the plane and tested the air before the plane was evacuated.

“You do kinda feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere,” Kissinger said of the Grand Junction airport. “There’s a Subway (sandwich shop) and that’s about it.”

To read the full story, click here.

If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Boeing sued over ‘toxic’ plane cabin air

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events

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Reprinted from The Hill.  Be Keith Laing.

Today we cover another story looking into the issue of toxic air on Boeing planes.  As this issue continues to gain momentum, the shift from local area news to national news proves that people are paying attention.  Brodkowitz Law represents the four flight attendants in this case.

A group of flight attendants are suing airplane manufacturer Boeing for allegedly exposing them to “toxic” air inside its planes, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The flight attendants, who worked for Alaska Airlines, are alleging that Boeing knowingly exposed passengers and flight crews to toxic air that was sucked into its planes through the engine by the system that is used to maintain cabin pressure during flights, according to the report.

The paper said the lawsuit, which was filed in Cook County, Ill. Circuit Court, accuses Boeing planes of having defects with its “bleed-air” systems that make the company responsible for health problems that were experienced by the flight attendants.

A lawyer for the flight attendants told the paper that Boeing has had knowledge of the problems with its ventilation systems for years.

“Our focus is on Boeing not fixing a problem they’ve known about for more than 60 years,” Attorney Rainey Booth said. “The risk to any individual passenger might be low on a daily basis, but what we know is, every day people in this country are exposed.”

The lawsuit alleges that flight attendants became sick after a Jan. 12, 2013 Alaska Air flight from Boston to San Diego, according to the report.

The flight attendants contend that toxic fumes began coming into the vents during the flight, which resulted in two of them passing out and one vomiting.

The plane was diverted to Chicago’s O’Haire International Airport when the problems were reported to the pilot.

“I remember walking down the aisle and just gripping the seatbacks because I felt like I was going to fall over,” one of the flight attendants who is a plaintiff in the lawsuit, Vanessa Woods, told the paper.

“The next thing I know, I was on the galley floor, looking up at Faye who was paging for assistance,” she continued. “She was mumbling incoherently into the PA system. It was beyond frightening.”

Boeing declined to comment on the lawsuit on Tuesday, but the company has said previously that research shows that the air in the cabin of its planes is safe to breathe.

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA) union said Tuesday afternoon that is supports the Alaska Airlines employees that filed the lawsuit against Boeing.

“We support our fellow Flight Attendants in their efforts to seek justice after breathing in contaminated air on board the aircraft. Their experience is similar to many others throughout the airline industry who have experienced contaminated air events,” AFA-CWA president at Alaska Airlines, Jeffrey Peterson, said in a statement.

“In fact, AFA has been fighting for cleaner cabin air for decades while the industry has refused to acknowledge the problem,” Peterson continued. “More recently AFA has been supporting research at the University of Washington to create a blood test that will be able to determine if crew members were poisoned so that proper treatment could begin as soon as possible. Our efforts will continue as we push for sensors and filters to be installed in all aircraft as well as changes to future aircraft design to avoid engine bleed air that can become contaminated. AFA’s global efforts to define this problem so it can be fixed will continue until contaminated bleed air has no way into the cabin ever again.”

-This story was last updated at 5:49 p.m.

To read the story and follow it for updates, click here.

If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Flight attendants sue Boeing, claim cabin air can be toxic

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events

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Reprinted from KING 5.  Jake Whittenberg, KING 5 News

Four Alaska Airlines flight attendants are suing The Boeing Company with claims the air ventilation system on its airplanes can sometimes contain toxic fumes.

The lawsuit was filed in Cook County, Illinois, the home of Boeing headquarters. It points to one flight in particular in July 2013. In that instance, the four flight attendants claim they could smell a foul odor the moment they boarded the plane. They say it became so bad after take-off, they began to feel disoriented and nauseous. One of them says she even passed out and required medical attention from a doctor on board. That flight made an emergency landing in Chicago.

The claim points to the “bleed air” design on almost all Boeing aircraft. Air is cycled into the cabin using the airplane engines. But if a seal in an engine leaks, that air can sometimes be exposed to burning engine oil.

“We know Boeing has known about this problem since the 1950’s,” said Rainey Booth, the attorney representing the flight attendants. “This was the primary problem that they had to address with this ‘bleed air’ design. And it’s the problem they’ve fixed now with its newest design the 787.”

The 787 Dreamliner cycles air from outside the airplane.

Boeing isn’t commenting specifically on the lawsuit filed by the flight attendants, but says air on its planes is safe to breathe and “‘research consistently” shows that “cabin air meets health and safety standards and that contaminant levels are generally low.”

One of the flight attendants says her exposure to toxic fumes on that flight in 2013 has left her with long lasting neurological issues including shaking and nausea .

“When I reach for something my hand shakes. Just to be frank, it’s embarrassing,” said flight attendant Vanessa Woods. “I hope it will get better. I have to stop this from happening to one other person.”

To watch the report via KING 5, click here.

Brodkowitz Law represents the four flight attendants in this case.   If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Are toxic fumes leaking into passenger planes?

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes

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Correspondent Tom Costello reports the results of an NBC News investigation into the air quality in passenger planes.

Watch Are toxic fumes leaking into passenger planes?

Following the filing of a lawsuit in Cook County, Illinois, NBC looks into the topic of toxic fumes on passenger planes.

Brodkowitz Law is among the law firms that are currently representing the plaintiffs in this matter.

For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Lawsuit against Boeing says airplane cabin air can turn toxic

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

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Reprinted from the Chicago Tribune.  

Airplane cabin air can turn toxic, sickening passengers and crew, a problem that’s been alleged for decades in the U.S. and around the world, says a lawsuit filed Monday against Chicago-based aircraft-maker Boeing Co.

Boeing’s “dirty little secret,” as the lawsuit calls it, in one instance led to those flight attendants vomiting and three of them passing out during a coast-to-coast flight that was diverted to Chicago in 2013. They were taken to a Chicago hospital, and two of them never returned to work, according to the plaintiffs’ lawyer.

Attorneys for the flight attendants claim the crew was “poisoned” and that Boeing’s “design defects” and failure to warn anybody about the dangers of toxic cabin air were fraudulent and negligent, and that the company is “knowingly endangering airplane passengers.”

One expert said that such “fume events” are relatively common, likely happening on at least one U.S. flight per day.

However, Boeing over the years has maintained that there is no problem with bleed air, and that contaminants in cabin air remain at safe levels — assertions that it says are backed up by independent studies. On Monday, Boeing declined to comment about the lawsuit.

Chuck Horning, chairman of the aviation maintenance science department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla., said contaminated bleed air can happen, but in his mind it’s not a common occurrence. “Under normal conditions, I would find it hard to believe this would be a problem,” Horning said.

All commercial aircraft models manufactured by Boeing and its rival Airbus of France use bleed-air systems, except for Boeing’s newest model, the 787 Dreamliner. Fume events stem from jet engine oil contaminating the air. Contamination can happen for many reasons, including leaking engine seals, engine malfunctions and overfilling of an oil reservoir, according to the lawsuit.

Inhaling toxic cabin air can cause injuries because chemicals from heated jet engine oil include neurotoxins such as organophosphates, which are used in pesticides and nerve gases, the suit said.

Similar allegations about health effects from bleed-air systems have been made around the world, recently gaining attention in the United Kingdom and Australia, according to published reports.

The lawsuit filed Monday documents how Boeing has been “put on notice” more than 40 times that its aircraft were “unreasonably dangerous” but it failed to fix the problem by installing filters or sensors and alarms that could alert cabin crew of a toxic-fume problem.

“Our focus is on Boeing not fixing a problem they’ve known about for more than 60 years,” Rainey Booth, one of the attorneys for the flight attendants, said in an interview. “The risk to any individual passenger might be low on a daily basis, but what we know is, every day people in this country are exposed.”

Rainey said the flight attendants are seeking unspecified monetary damages, but the suit goes beyond that. “This needs to be fixed,” Rainey said. “This is a very fixable, unnecessary risk.”

Judith Anderson, an industrial hygienist who researches flight attendant health issues for the Association of Flight Attendants union, called using bleed air “a flawed design.”

“You shouldn’t be pulling air off an engine for ventilation air when you know that the engine can leak toxic oil into the air supply — without installing appropriate design measures to prevent the breathing air from being contaminated,” Anderson said. “It doesn’t make sense.”

According to the lawsuit:

The Alaska Airlines flight attendants are suing over an incident on July 12, 2013, when they were part of the crew on a relatively new Boeing model 737 — manufactured in 2012 — on a flight from Boston to San Diego. They noticed an unpleasant smell in the cabin, and Woods soon began feeling sick and eventually passed out. Neben told the flight captain that fumes were coming from the vents and that her throat was burning, and she was not feeling well. Oskardottir then said she didn’t feel well, fainted and vomited. Two passengers with medical training tried to help. Then Ramirez and Neben got sick.

“I remember walking down the aisle and just gripping the seatbacks because I felt like I was going to fall over,” Woods said in an interview. “The next thing I know, I was on the galley floor, looking up at Faye who was paging for assistance. She was mumbling incoherently into the PA system.

To read the entire story from the Chicago Tribune, click here.
Brodkowitz Law is among the law firms representing these four flight attendants.  If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.
For more information about contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact Brodkowitz Law.  Like our Facebook page to receive breaking contaminated bleed air information.

Allegiant Air has second emergency landing this month

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Other Events, Safety

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Reprinted from the Tampa Bay Times.  By William R. Levesque and Claire McNeill, Times Staff Writers

CLEARWATER — An Allegiant Air flight made an emergency landing at St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport on Wednesday after pressurization problems, the second time this month an Allegiant aircraft has been forced to return to the airport.

Flight 866 had been heading to Pittsburgh before landing in Clearwater at 5:07 p.m., just under an hour after taking off, according to the airline.

The flight made it about as far north as Ocala before reversing course, according to the flight tracking website FlightAware.com.

Allegiant’s maintenance team was evaluating the plane Wednesday evening. In the meantime, the airline rescheduled a flight for 7:10 p.m. All 154 passengers were given $50 vouchers for future travel.

“I don’t feel safe flying Allegiant,” said one displaced passenger, Mary Fagan, who said there were several dozen others who, like herself, chose not to take the rescheduled flight. “You just get that feeling. It’s scary.”

Fagan, who had been flying north for work, fell asleep after takeoff. She was nudged awake by the man next to her, who told her about the turnaround.

“I said, ‘Am I dreaming or what?’ ” she recalled. Later, as the rescheduled flight took off, she waited for her niece to pick her up.

“It’s just very frustrating,” she said. “I don’t know what my next move is.”

Earlier in June, another Allegiant flight made an emergency landing after taking off from the St. Pete-Clearwater airport. Smoke appeared in the plane’s cabin about eight minutes after takeoff, and passengers disembarked on emergency slides after landing. Three passengers and one flight attendant reported injuries, and the airline gave all passengers $200 and a full refund.

Allegiant pilots reported more than three dozen mechanical issues across the country from September to March, including nine incidents involving St. Pete-Clearwater International. An April report detailing those incidents was compiled by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters’ Aviation Mechanics Coalition, or TAMC.

Chris Moore, a TAMC chairman and veteran aviation mechanic who wrote the report, said in an interview that Wednesday’s emergency landing was just the latest evidence that the airline needs to do more to address safety issues.

“This supports everything we’ve been saying,” Moore said of the latest incident. “The problem is there. We’ve been seeing it on almost a daily basis not just in Florida but around the country. The FAA needs to take a much closer look, a much harder look at Allegiant’s maintenance program.”

To read the rest of the article, click here.

As the article states, earlier this month an Allegiant Airplane had to make an emergency landing due to smoke filling the cabin.  If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

At Brodkowitz Law, we understand that emergencies and delays while on a flight may lead to injury and distress. For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us.  You can also find us onFacebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.