American Airlines Flight 228 makes Emergency Landing

Author: admin  |  Category: Safety

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American Airlines Flight 228 en route to Chicago from Shanghai made an emergency landing in Cold Bay, Alaska, on Wednesday morning.

The Boeing 787 was at cruising altitude when the pilot noticed an indicator light turn on, suggesting a mechanical problem with the plane. According to a passenger on board, the pilots then opted for an emergency landing on the thrust of one engine to the nearest airport.

100 passengers and fourteen flight crewmembers stayed around eight hours in Cold Bay until an Alaska Air Boeing 737 arrived to take them back to Chicago. American Airlines coordinated the replacement flight with Alaska Airlines on the reasoning the latter had extensive operating experience in the region.

The mechanical problem with the plane is currently not resolved. American Airlines sent two mechanics to inspect and diagnose the plane in Cold Bay.

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2 injured in crash of small plane near Port Townsend

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Safety

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Originally published September 28, 2015 at 1:54 pm via The Seattle Times

Firefighters work to remove the injured from the wreckage of a plane (Photo courtesy of East Jefferson Fire and Rescue)

Firefighters work to remove the injured from the wreckage of a plane (Photo courtesy of East Jefferson Fire and Rescue)

Two people were reportedly injured after a small plane crashed at Discovery Bay Golf Course southwest of Port Townsend.

Update at 2:21 p.m.: The victims, a man and a woman, are each being flown from the crash site by Airlift Northwest helicopter. Still no word on conditions.

Update at 2 p.m.: Two people have been pulled from the plane wreckage and are being evaluated, East Jefferson Fire and Rescue said in a tweet.

Original post: Two people were reportedly injured after a small plane crashed at Discovery Bay Golf Course southwest of Port Townsend.

East Jefferson Fire and Rescue reports two people are trapped in the plane. The extent of their injuries wasn’t immediately known.

Original story via Seattle Times Staff.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the aircraft was a Cessna 150, Registration No. N8529G.  The aircraft “force landed” resulting in serious injuries to the two people onboard.  Preliminary information from the FAA can be found here. This page provides preliminary accident and incident information reported to the Office of Accident Investigation & Prevention within the past 10 business days. All information is preliminary and subject to change.

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British Airways Jet Catches Fire at Las Vegas Airport; 20 Injured

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Fumes, Other Events, Safety

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Via NBCnews.com

Original story by , and

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the engine failure that caused an intense fire on a British Airways Boeing 777 as it prepared for takeoff in Las Vegas, sending 20 passengers to the hospital.

Passengers used inflatable slides to escape the blaze on Tuesday afternoon at McCarran International Airport, just before the plane was to embark on a 10-hour flight to London Gatwick.

Thick clouds of black smoke billowed from the left engine of the plane as the passengers scurried across the tarmac. Witnesses said the fire was so intense that it melted windows on the plane.

Sunrise Hospital said it treated 20 patients. The airline said Wednesday that everyone had been released. It also pledged its cooperation with the NTSB.

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photo via Twitter: https://twitter.com/SuaveCastro

Cockpit alarms could be heard on recordings of the pilots’ mayday call to air traffic controllers.

The Boeing 777 experienced an engine failure after being cleared for takeoff at around 4:13 p.m. (7:13 p.m. ET) at McCarran International Airport, the airport said.

Full story, via NBC News here.

We will update this blog with preliminary Information from the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration, as it becomes available.

Additional details can be found, here.

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Rough landing: ‘I remember just thinking, this is it,’ says passenger

Author: admin  |  Category: Crashes, Other Events, Safety

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Washington (CNN) For a minute, Christine Malloy was very worried. As a frequent flier, she was used to rough landings once in a while. But Malloy could tell this landing was different.

“Within seconds, the plane dropped to the ground,” she told CNN on Wednesday. “And it dropped really hard.”

Malloy was one of 159 passengers and crew aboard American Airlines/US Airways Flight 1851 flying Saturday from Atlanta to North Carolina’s Charlotte Douglas International Airport.

As the Airbus A321 nearly touched down on the runway, the jetliner hit several runway lights, according to the FAA.

“I remember just thinking, this is it.” she said. “I tightened my seat belt and I just grabbed on to the seat really hard.”

“Things were really chaotic,” she said. “We had people screaming. There were things kind of flying around in the air.”

Malloy and a fellow passenger comforted each other for a brief moment. “We put our hands through the seat and we held hands,” she remembered. “I just said a prayer and held on really tight.”

Then Malloy said she could feel the plane gain altitude as the pilot aborted the landing.

She wondered, “What’s going on here, right? Is it the weather? Is it the pilot?”

Minutes later, the plane landed safely on its second try. No injuries were reported, American Airlines the parent company of US Airways, said in a statement to CNN.

The flight crew was performing what’s called a “go-around,” lining up the aircraft for another landing.

Go-arounds are standard safety procedures that pilots use during approach when airliners aren’t lined up properly for landing. They abort the landing and “go around” to set up for another attempt.

The flight crew blamed wind shear for the aborted landing, according to the FAA. Wind shear is a weather phenomenon that results in a sudden downward burst of wind just before landing.

Since 1943, 87 airline, military and business jet incidents have been blamed on wind shear and downdrafts, according to Aviation Week and the Flight Safety Foundation.

In the 1970s and ’80s, deadly wind shear crashes led to better flight training and robust radar technology that have helped pilots avoid this dangerous weather phenomenon.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating Saturday’s incident and are examining weather conditions, in addition to the airliner’s cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder.

The airline said the captain discovered damage to the underside of the aircraft. Workers found debris and damaged lights on the runway, according to the FAA, prompting the temporary closure of the runway.

The plane has been taken out of service, the airline said.

Original story, here.

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Allegiant Air execs at controls of flight that landed with low fuel

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Reprinted from the Las Vegas Review Journal.  By Richard N. Velotta.

Two Allegiant Air executives, the vice president of operations and the director of flight safety, were at the controls of the flight that made an emergency landing last week because it was nearly out of fuel.

Greg Baden, Allegiant’s vice president of operations, and Michael Wuerger, director of flight safety, government affairs and quality assurance, were flying Allegiant’s Flight 426 from McCarran International Airport to the Fargo, N.D., Hector International Airport on July 23.

A representative of Allegiant confirmed that Baden and Wuerger were flying the plane, adding it is not uncommon for members of operations management to take flights to maintain their pilot status.

Allegiant said it is cooperating with the Federal Aviation Administration in an investigation of the emergency landing, which was complicated by the closure of the Fargo airport for a practice session of the Navy’s Blue Angels precision flight team, which was preparing for an air show.

Flight 426, with 144 passengers and six crew members on board, left Las Vegas an hour behind schedule and couldn’t reach Fargo before closure of the airspace.

While a transcript of the conversation between the Allegiant cockpit and Fargo’s air traffic control center indicated the twin-engine MD-80 jet was dangerously low on fuel as it approached Fargo, Allegiant officials say the plane had 42 minutes of fuel remaining when it arrived at 1:02 p.m., Central Daylight Time.

The exchange between the plane and the tower, posted Tuesday on the LifeATC.net website, indicated that airline officials were trying to contact the tower by phone to get clearance to land, but were unsuccessful, leading to further conversation once the plane was within range of the Fargo tower.  To read the full transcript of the exchange, click here and here.

This is another in a string of incidents that have plagued Allegiant Air in the last month.  Earlier in July, an Allegiant Air plane was forced to make an emergency landing after take off due to mechanical problems.  This came just a week after one of their planes was unable to take off after sitting on the runway for over an hour.

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9 Terrifying Things That Will Make You Rethink Flying

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Photo by Corbis. Design by Erik Mace for Yahoo Travel

Photo by Corbis. Design by Erik Mace for Yahoo Travel

Reprinted from Yahoo Travel.  By Sid Lipsey.

Well, that doesn’t inspire confidence.

Reports that an air traffic controller was found drunk on the job at Springdale Municipal Airport in Arkansas are sparking everything from disbelief to laughs to references to the 1980s comedy Airplane (“Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit drinkin’,” says a air traffic control character). But for some of us, a bizarre story like this is inspiring a more serious reaction — terror. We’re wondering anew just what the heck we’re getting ourselves into when we get on a plane.

Yes, we all know that, while airplanes are extremely safe, in extremely rare cases things can go wrong. And we all have a pretty good idea of what some of those things are. What’s really scary, though, is the stuff we really don’t consider — like wasted air traffic controllers, for instance. Knowing that kind of potential even exists in the world is just one more thing we have to push out of our minds the next time we get on a plane.

To read the full list, click here.

And don’t be surprised if you see a picture of your pilot on Facebook while he is flying.  Apparently, selfies in the cockpit are a real, and terrifying, reality.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Flight Makes Emergency Landing After Passengers Feel Ill

Author: admin  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

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Reprinted from ABC News.  By AP Staff.

A flight from Denver to Los Angeles was diverted to Grand Junction on Wednesday after a number of passengers reported feeling ill.

United Airlines spokeswoman Jennifer Dohm said the crew of the Airbus A320 deployed oxygen masks and decided to land in the western Colorado city.

There were reports of smoke in the cockpit and cabin, but Grand Junction Fire Department spokesman Shawn Montgomery said firefighters saw no smoke when they entered the plane, and that was confirmed by air monitors. All of the passengers were able to walk off the plane, and one person was taken to the hospital for evaluation.

Montgomery said a passenger had a medical problem during the flight, which caused other passengers to become anxious, light-headed and nauseated. He declined to say what the medical problem was.

United Airlines said Flight 447 carried a crew of six and 150 passengers. Passengers were flown to Los Angeles on a different plane Wednesday afternoon.

Jeremy Kissinger, an event coordinator on his way to Los Angeles with his friends for vacation, was sitting in row 37 of the plane when he noticed a passenger who appeared to have passed out several rows in front of him. Flight attendants began attending to the passenger.

“There was an announcement that there was a problem with the air and they were going to drop the masks,” Kissinger said.

Kissinger said everything seemed normal until the oxygen masks came down, adding that he noticed several people heading to the bathrooms as soon as they were able. He did not smell anything out of the ordinary nor experience any illness but said other people in the same general area fell ill.

Firefighters in full gear, including air tanks, boarded the plane and tested the air before the plane was evacuated.

“You do kinda feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere,” Kissinger said of the Grand Junction airport. “There’s a Subway (sandwich shop) and that’s about it.”

To read the full story, click here.

If you believe you may have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events.

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Allegiant jet makes emergency landing in Central Florida

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Reprinted from www.clickorlando.com.  Author: Erica Rakow, Reporter.

SANFORD, Fla. -

Allegiant Airlines is facing more problems.

In the most recent incident, a jet was forced to make an emergency landing in Central Florida because of a mechanical problem.

The issue occurred Monday on a flight from Ft. Lauderdale to Memphis. About 45 minutes into the flight, something went wrong on board, forcing the pilot to divert and make an emergency landing at the Orlando-Sanford International Airport.

Last week, passengers on a flight from Jacksonville had their flight canceled after sitting on the runway for over an hour. The flight was rescheduled the following day, when the same thing happened.

Allegiant pilots have raised concerns about safety.  Last month, pilots accused the airline of having a “bare minimum approach to maintenance” after a series of emergency landings in St. Petersburg.

Allegiant has one of the oldest fleets of jets in country, but the airline said it also has one of the best safety records.

Allegiant said it’s conducting an investigation into the latest emergency landing in Central Florida to figure out what happened.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us. You can also find us on Facebook for up-to-date information about our firm and breaking stories.

Southwest Airlines plane runs off tarmac

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Reprinted from WRIC.com.  By Emily Satchell.

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — A plane with passengers on board ran off the tarmac at Richmond International Airport early Monday morning.

Southwest Flight number 4636 departed Orlando and arrived this morning here in Richmond, officials with Southwest Airlines said in a statement released to 8News.

“After making a routine landing, the aircraft veered off of the taxiway and into the grass, while slowly transitioning to the gate,” Southwest’s statement continued.

An 8News viewer sent us pictures of the plane as it sat on the taxiway. In the photos, several assistance vehicles can be seen out there trying to help. Passengers say the plane was going fast down the tarmac before eventually running off the taxiway.

“Everything started shaking and the pilot was on the intercom talking to us and hung up real quick,” said passenger Gage Yesbeck.

Southwest says that after a one-hour delay, the 131 customers and five crew member aboard were deplaned and transported to the terminal.

To read the full story, including updates, click here.

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Another Southwest Flight Aborts Takeoff at Chicago’s Midway

Author: admin  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Reprinted from ABC News.

For the second time this week, a Southwest Airlines plane has aborted a takeoff at Chicago’s Midway International Airport.

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Elizabeth Isham Cory says the crew reported an engine problem Friday and the FAA will investigate.

Southwest said the Philadelphia-bound plane with 136 passengers returned to the gate after the pilot of another Southwest aircraft saw “potential signs of a mechanical issue.” Spokeswoman Emily Samuels says an initial review found nothing wrong but the aircraft remains in maintenance.

On Wednesday night, a Southwest plane headed to Boston from Midway cut short its takeoff because of a mechanical issue. The Fire Department said one of that plane’s engines caught fire.

In another incident at Midway, ground equipment struck a Southwest plane and a jet bridge Thursday.

To read the full story, click here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide visit our website or contact us.