Report: Delta B757 near Seattle on Feb 27th 2011, turbulence injures 2

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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By Simon Hradecky, created Saturday, Oct 6th 2012 15:01Z, last updated Wednesday, Nov 28th 2012 13:28Z

A Delta Airlines Boeing 757-200, registration N684DA performing flight DL-1557 from Salt Lake City, UT to Seattle, WA (USA) with 184 passengers and 6 crew, was enroute about 45 minutes prior to estimated landing when air traffic control advised the crew of a pilot report indicating light to moderate chop while descending through about FL200 and 16,000 feet. The captain thus instructed cabin crew to secure the cabin early and to expect a bumpy descent, the initial and final chimes would be given earlier than the usual 20 and 10 minutes prior to landing. Upon leaving FL350 the captain illuminated the fasten seat belt sign and made an announcement including the cabin crew should prepare the cabin for arrival. While the aircraft descended through FL260, the captain toggled the seat belt sign twice (final chimes), at FL250 the first officer, pilot flying, began to slow the aircraft to turbulence penetration speed. About a minute later, descending through FL240 about 50nm southeast of Seattle around 22:20L (06:20Z Feb 28th) and entering a layer of cloud, the aircraft encountered moderate turbulence that lasted for 30 seconds. At that time, three flight attendants were still out of their seats securing the cabin, and a passenger was returning from the lavatory. One of the three flight attendants, located near the aft galley and just making an announcement, as well as the passenger returning from the lavatory were thrown to the floor and received injuries. The aircraft continued for a safe landing in Seattle.

On Oct 6th 2012 the NTSB released their factual report reporting that light rain and winds gusting up to 20 knots were moving through the area at the time. The flight attendant thrown to the floor received fractures of the second, third and fourth metatarsal bones in her right foot, the passenger complained about a sore ankle and was released after medical evaluation at the airport.

On Nov 28th 2012 the NTSB released their final report concluding the probable cause of the accident was:

The airplane’s encounter with moderate turbulence at a higher altitude than the flight crew expected, resulting in an injury to a cabin crewmember.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/DAL1557/history/20110228/0454Z/KSLC/KSEA

Infrared Satellite Image GOES-W Feb 28th 2011 06:00Z (Graphics: AVH/NASA):
Infrared Satellite Image GOES-W Feb 28th 2011 06:00Z (Graphics: AVH/NASA)

Two reported bird strike incidents on Monday, November 26, 2012

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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By Simon Hradecky, via  The Aviation Herald

A Jetblue Airbus A320-200, registration N571JB performing flight B6-1751 from Fort Lauderdale, FL (USA) to San Juan (Puerto Rico) with 151 people on board, was climbing through 2000 feet out of Fort Lauderdale’s runway 09L when the crew reported they had a bird strike at about a 1000 feet just past the departure end of the runway and wanted to return to Fort Lauderdale but did not need assistance/priority. After working the checklists, about 5 minutes after leveling off, the crew declared emergency as a precaution. A runway inspection found no debris. The aircraft landed safely on Fort Lauderdale’s runway 09L about 25 minutes after departure.

A postflight inspection revealed the right hand engine (V2527) had ingested a bird.

A replacement Airbus A320-200 registration N569JB reached San Juan with a delay of about 2.5 hours.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/JBU1751/history/20121126/1114Z/KFLL/TJSJ

Full story and comments, here.

Another bird strike incident occurred on the same day:

Also reported by Simon Hradecky, via The Aviation Herald

A United Airbus A320-200, registration N425UA performing flight UA-380 from Fort Lauderdale, FL to Cleveland, OH (USA), was on approach to Cleveland’s runway 24R when the aircraft took a bird impact at the right hand side. The aircraft continued for a safe landing on runway 24R.

The FAA reported the aircraft received damage to the #2 engine (V2527), right hand wing and flaps.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/UAL380/history/20121124/2029Z/KFLL/KCLE

Full story, here.

You can view the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s Preliminary Accident and Incident Notices on the FAA website, here.  This page provides preliminary accident and incident information reported to the Office of Accident Investigation & Prevention within the past 10 business days. All information is preliminary and subject to change.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Accident: Neos B763 over Atlantic on Nov 19th 2012, turbulence injures 66

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety, Turbulence

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By Simon Hradecky, created Monday, Nov 19th 2012 18:19Z, last updated Tuesday, Nov 20th 2012 18:50Z

The Aviation Herald

A Neos Boeing 767-300, registration I-NDMJ performing flight NO-731 from Havana (Cuba) to Milan Malpensa (Italy) with 268 passengers and 10 crew, was enroute over the Atlantic about two hours into the flight when the aircraft encountered turbulence causing an altitude deviation of about 1000 feet. The aircraft restabilised, two doctors on board assessed the injured and did not recommend to divert indicating the injuries were mainly contusions. The crew decided to continue to Milan reporting about 35 passengers needed medical attention prompting a massive emergency response in Milan with numerous ambulances dispatched to the airport. The aircraft landed safely in Milan. 66 people required medical attention, 55 of them were taken to hospitals.

Passengers reported they were not noticing anything out of the usual, cabin crew were just serving lunch when the aircraft encountered turbulence throwing all loose items like the lunch trays as well as flight attendants and passengers not wearing their seat belts through the cabin. Many passengers hit the cabin ceiling and received cuts, bruises as well as loose teeth. Two doctors examined the injured.

The FAA reported on Nov 20th that the aircraft encountered severe turbulence in Oceanic Airspace controlled by New York Oceanic Control.

Full story and comments, via The Aviation Herald, here.

The Federal Aviation Administration preliminary data can be found here.  It will be available for ten days from the date of the notice.

Another report can be found via Airnation.net.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

F-22 fighter jet crashes in Florida

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Crashes, Fumes, Safety

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By Larry Shaughnessy, CNN Pentagon Producer via CNN.com

updated 6:06 PM EST, Thu November 15, 2012

(CNN) — WASHINGTON (CNN) — An F-22 fighter jet crashed Thursday afternoon near Tyndall Air Force Base in the Florida panhandle. The pilot ejected safely, according to Lt. Col. John Dorrian, a spokesman for the U.S. Air Force.

Tyndall AFB is a training base for F-22 pilots. There’s no confirmation that the plane took off from Tyndall before the crash, but that would be logical, Dorrian said.

The F-22 has been the focus of years of investigations about a problem that causes some of the stealth fighter’s pilots to become dizzy or black out. The exact cause of the problem still hasn’t been identified.

Full story, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and crew worldwide, please visit our website and contact us for a free consultation.

Woman sues Air Canada, alleges she was burned by hot water 0

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Burns, Safety

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 By Tony Blais, Edmonton Sun

EDMONTON - An Edmonton woman has launched a $206,000 lawsuit against Air Canada because she claims she suffered second-degree burns from a spilled cup of scalding hot water.

According to the statement of claim, Rema Halabi was seated on a flight from Calgary to San Francisco on Nov. 5, 2010, when the flight attendants began to serve refreshments.

Halabi alleges one of the flight attendants placed a cup of scalding hot water to make tea on the tray before her.

A passenger seated in front of Halabi then leaned back and jarred the tray, spilling the cup of scalding hot water onto Halabi’s pubic area, the inside of her thighs and down to her knees, the statement of claim says.

Halabi alleges she suffered serious and permanent injuries, including second-degree burns, blistering and scarring, and lack of sensation, and has had difficulty forming intimate relationships.

The 35-year-old massage therapist also claims she suffered severe post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, anxiety, panic attacks and bouts of anger. She says all this has limited her ability to earn a living.

The statement of claim alleges the flight attendant was negligent for serving passengers scalding hot water, failing to ensure that the water was not of a dangerously high temperature and failing to put a lid on the cup.

It alleges Air Canada was negligent for failing to ensure she would be safe on her flight, failing to retain reasonably competent employees and failing to take reasonable steps to train its employees.

A statement of defence has not yet been filed.

None of Halabi’s allegations have been proven in court.

Full story, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and crew worldwide, please visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Delta Flight makes emergency landing in New York after engine fails

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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Published November 7, 2012

Associated Press via Foxnews.com

SYRACUSE, New York - Officials say a Delta passenger jet made an emergency landing in Syracuse, N.Y., after one of its engines failed.

Syracuse Department of Aviation Commissioner Christina Callahan tells WSYR-TV that the MD-80 with 102 people on board landed safely at Syracuse Hancock International Airport around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday.  She says the pilot reported that one of the two engines wasn’t working.

The flight originated in Detroit and was headed to Hartford, Conn., when it was diverted to Syracuse.

Full story, here.

According to Flightstats.com the flight was Delta Airlines Flight 1430 from Detroit (DTW) to Hartford (BDL).

There are no preliminary accident or incident notices available from the FAA at this time, however, you may chose to monitor their website, here.  Preliminary data is available on the site for ten days.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

FAA urges airlines to inspect seats made by Texas firm

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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November 6, 2012

The FAA recommends that airlines using seats made by Weber Aircraft - which made seats that came loose on American Airlines planes last month - inspect them.

FAA urges airlines to inspect seats made by Texas firm 

Seats from an American Airlines 757 are carried off last month at Logan International Airport in Boston. (WBZ-TV / October 2, 2012).

The Federal Aviation Administration has recommended inspections for airlines that use seats made by the same Texas manufacturer of seats that came loose last month on several American Airlines planes.

Reports of loose seats on three American Airlines flights forced the Fort Worth carrier last month to temporarily ground and inspect almost 100 jets to ensure the seats were securely fastened to the cabin floor.

After initially blaming the problem on a faulty seat clamp, the airline later said that the problem had to do with locking pins in the seat that failed to engage, possibly because of a build-up of spilled soft drinks, coffee and juice.

American said it inspected and installed secondary locking devices on 48 of the airline’s Boeing 757 planes and 49 Boeing 767 planes.

“The installation work is complete,” American spokeswoman Mary Frances Fagan said.

Weber Aircraft, the Gainesville, Texas, company that manufactured the seats for American Airlines, issued instructions Friday on how to inspect and replace fittings on those seats, if needed. The instructions say Weber has sold seats to 25 other airlines that could be affected by the problem, including Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, Air Canada and Korean Air Lines.

A representative for Weber could not be reached for comment.

The FAA recommended that airlines using 11 Weber seat models inspect them “for loose seats and incorrectly installed fittings.”

The FAA stopped short of calling for a mandatory inspection, saying the problem “has not been determined to be an unsafe condition that would warrant airworthiness directive action,” a more serious inspection requirement.

A United Airlines representative said the carrier no longer uses those models of Weber seats recommended for inspection by the FAA.

Full story, via The LA Times, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured airline passengers and crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Accident: United A320 near Boston on Oct 26th 2012, turbulence injures 2

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety, Turbulence

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Via The Aviation Herald

By, Simon Hradecky, created Wednesday, October 31, 2012

A United Airlines Airbus A320-200, registration N427UA performing flight UA-456 from San Francisco, CA to Boston, MA (USA), was descending through about FL 200 about 45nm west of Boston when the aircraft encountered turbulence causing injuries to two occupants of the aircraft.  The aircraft continued for a safe landing about 15 minutes later.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reported two occupants recieved unknown injuries as a result of turbulence.

The full story from original source, here.

Flight tracking information, here.

The FAA Preliminary Incident Report for the October 26, 2012 occurrence can be found here. This page provides preliminary accident and incident information reported to the Office of Accident Investigation & Prevention within the past 10 business days. All information is preliminary and subject to change.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.