Delta A320 at Salt Lake City on Feb 23rd 2013, haze in cabin

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

.

By Simon Hradecky, The Aviation Herald

A Delta Airlines Airbus A320-200, registration N356NW performing flight DL-1158 from Salt Lake City,UT to Orlando,FL (USA) with 151 people on board, was climbing out of Salt Lake City’s runway 34R with low visibility procedures in effect when an acrid odor as well as haze developed in the cabin prompting the crew to don their oxygen masks and stop the climb at 11,000 feet indicating they wanted to return to Salt Lake City without mentioning the problem however. About 4 minutes later the crew reported they had smoke in the cockpit, which had started to dissipate at that point. The aircraft returned to Salt Lake City for a safe landing on runway 34L (3500 feet RVR) about 20 minutes after departure.

A replacement Airbus A320-200 registration N375NC reached Orlando with a delay of 4.5 hours

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/DAL1158/history/20130223/1654Z/KSLC/KMCO

Passenger photo in the cabin (Photo: Blake Scarbrough)

Passenger photo in the cabin (Photo: Blake Scarbrough):

Full story, here.

If you have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events. Bring this document to your doctor.

For more information, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Small jet crashes in Georgia; 5 dead

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Crashes, Safety

.

From Dave Alsup, CNN

(CNN) — A small plane crashed in east Georgia on Wednesday night, leaving five people dead, authorities said.

The light jet aircraft landed at Thomson-McDuffie Regional Airport in Thomson, and ran off the end of the runway, according to Kathleen Bergen, a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman.

Two people survived the crash and were rushed to a hospital, McDuffie County Sheriff Logan Marshall told CNN affiliate WJBF.

Georgia plane crash kills five

The flight took off from John C. Tune Airport in Nashville, Tennessee.

The two cities are about 350 miles apart; Thomson is about 30 miles west of Augusta.

The aircraft is a Hawker Beechcraft 390/Premier I.

Original story, via CNN, here.

Additional details are available via USA Today, here.

After an airplane crash there are a lot of questions. This is true regardless of whether the crash involves a private general aviation airplane or a commercial airline. A tragic reality of a plane crash is that often evidence and witnesses are lost in the crash itself.

Family members are left wondering why the aircraft crashed. Although the National Transportation Safety Board normally investigates airplane crashes, for a variety of reasons, the NTSB is unlikely to answer these questions. Often the pilot is blamed for the crash when it fact, he or she did absolutely everything in their power to avoid it. In such cases the real cause of a crash may remain hidden forever without the help of an aviation attorney and accident investigator or reconstructionist.

For more information visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Air Canada A320 near Montreal on Feb 15th 2013, smoke in cabin

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Fumes, Safety

.

By Simon Hradecky, via The Aviation Herald

An Air Canada Airbus A320-200, registration C-FMSX performing flight AC-1252 from Montreal,QC (Canada) to Cancun (Mexico) with 154 people on board, was climbing through 7000 feet out of Montreal when the crew declared PAN reporting smoke in the cabin and decided to return to Montreal. The aircraft positioned for an approach to Montreal’s runway 24R, the crew reported the situation on board had stabilized. The aircraft landed safely on runway 24R and stopped on the runway for an inspection by emergency services before vacating the runway about 10 minutes later and taxiing to the apron.

The Canadian TSB reported an evacuation was not required. A replacement A320 registration C-FPDN reached Cancun with a delay of 4 hours.

Original source, here.

All commercial jets (with the exception of the 787 Dreamliner) rely upon air pulled in through the engines to provide pressurized air to the cabin. During flight high-temperature compressed air is bled off the engines and, after being cooled, is re-circulated throughout the cabin and flight deck. Pyrolized engine oil or hydraulic fluid may contaminate the air in these compressors. As a result of exposure to this contaminated air, airline workers along with airline passengers, may develop chronic health problems leading them to seek attention from health care providers.

If you have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane and are experiencing health effects, there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events. Bring this document to your doctor.

For more information, visit www.brodkowitzlaw.com

Passengers Shaken Up After Flight Makes Emergency Landing in Northwest Arkansas

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

.

.

Story by, KNWA News

Some passengers were shaken up after a Continental/United Airlines flight made an emergency landing Monday morning at Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport.

The passengers are now forced to wait in long lines as they attempt to reschedule their flights.

The flight was reportedly carrying 53 people from Nashville to Denver when mechanical problems forced an emergency landing.

Full story, here.

Additional information was reported by AirNation.net:

United Airlines regional jet made an emergency landing at Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport Monday morning due to an as yet undisclosed mechanical problem.

United Flight 6016, an Embraer 145 operated by ExpressJet, was bound for Denver International (DEN) but diverted for a safe landing at Arkansas.

The flight was reportedly carrying 53 people.

We have reached out to United for more information and will report any that we receive.

Flight Path

Via, AirNation.net

For more information about Brodkowitz Law, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Flight evacuated at Nashville airport after fire

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

.

Story by The Associated Press via timesfreepress.com

NASHVILLE — Two dozen passengers were evacuated from a U.S. Airways airplane at the Nashville International Airport after a small electrical fire started.

The incident on Saturday afternoon involved flight No. 3411 from Philadelphia. Airport communications manager Shannon Sumrall told WKRN-TV that a defogging system on the plane’s windshield was manufacturing (sic) and is believed to have sparked the fire.

The fire was quickly extinguished and no injuries were reported.

U.S. Airways spokeswoman Michelle Mohr said the plane was operated by the airline’s partner, Republic Airlines.

Full story, here.

Additional information reported by AirNation.net:

wfaa.com reports:

‘The incident on Saturday afternoon involved Flight 3411 from Philadelphia. Airport communications manager Shannon Sumrall told WKRN-TV that a defogging system on the plane’s windshield was manufacturing [Editor's correction: malfunctioning] and is believed to have sparked the fire.

The fire was quickly extinguished and no injuries were reported.’

The aircraft was an Embraer 175.

More from AirNation.net, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured airline passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Watchdog sounds alarm over runway safety in Canada

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

.

Photo Via FSINFO.org

Story from Mississauga.com

More than seven years after an Air France plane shot ended up in a ditch on landing at Pearson Airport, Canada’s air safety watchdog is still concerned about runway overruns in this country.

The Transportation Safety Board is worried that foot-dragging by Ottawa on implementing tougher safety regulations and an unwillingness by airports to install safety measures are endangering the public.

The rate of runway overruns in Canada is twice the world average - and four times the world average when runways are wet.

An overrun occurs when a landing aircraft exceeds the available runway, running off the end.

With accidents showing little sign of decreasing, an exasperated TSB took the unusual step last month of taking to social media to make its point, tweeting a video expressing its concern.

“We first raised the issue of runway overruns and landing accidents in 2010 with the launch of our first safety watch list,” the safety board says in its video, “but since then, the number of accidents has not significantly decreased.

“This watchlist issue is one that can no longer be left unaddressed.”

“This is one area where the board is concerned and would like Transport Canada to do more,” says Mark Clitsome, the board’s director of investigations, air branch.

The safety board, an arm’s-length government agency mandated with investigating accidents and making safety recommendations, says there were 12 runway overruns in Canada in 2010 and nine in 2011.

There were 15 overruns in 2012, but the Safety Board cautions this figure is preliminary.

In 2005 an Air France A340 Airbus overran the runway while landing at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport during a severe thunderstorm. The 297 passengers and 12 crew members all survived, but the jet burst into flames and was destroyed.

The Air France episode sparked TSB criticism of Canada’s lack of compliance with international standards. Canada is still not in compliance.

The International Civil Aviation Organization mandates that there be a “runway end safety area” of at least 90 metres beyond the end of any runway longer than 1,200 metres, and recommends a runway safety area of 240 metres.

The safety board acknowledges the Greater Toronto Airports Authority has a 90-metre overrun at Pearson, but it is immediately followed by a ravine, which the Air France jet fell into after it overran the runway.

In its 2011 aviation review, Transport Canada stated it is revising runway standards and “will require certain designated certified aerodromes to install and maintain a Runway End Safety Area.”

However, Transport Canada said in an email these “revisions are not yet complete,” and won’t be for years. It said it has “the objective of commencing public consultations in late 2013 or early 2014.”

The Federal Aviation Administration in the United States requires a runway end safety area at major U.S. runways of at least 300 metres from the end of a runway.

Airports in the U.S. that have found it difficult to meet FAA compliance due to obstacles in place prior to implementation of runway safety area regulations have started installing something called an “engineered material arresting system” at the ends of runways. The system is a soft, crushable material designed to slow an aircraft that has exceeded the runway landing area.

The safety board is recommending airports in Canada install the arresting systems at runways that are unsuitable for overrun areas due to space limitations. In October 2012, Transport Canada issued an advisory to provide guidance for the installation of arresting systems, but such an advisory cannot mandate their installation.

“Currently, there are no airports in Canada with (the arresting system),” says Clitsome.

Clitsome acknowledges Transport Canada is doing “some studies and some research based on our recommendations, but we don’t know where or how far that’s developed.”

The safety board says “Canada now lags behind international standards” because airports have not installed overrun areas or arresting systems.

“The bottom line is, if we don’t do anything to prevent landing accidents and runway overruns, passengers, crew and aircraft will continue to be placed at unnecessary risk of injury or damage,” says Clitsome.

Even though Transport Canada acknowledges it does not yet have in place regulations mandating overrun areas, it maintains “Canada has one of the safest aviation systems in the world,” Transport Canada spokesperson Kelly James said in an email.

“Between 2000 and 2011, Canada’s air transportation accident rate decreased by 25 per cent.”

Full story, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Examiners try to ID victims in Casa Grande plane crash

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Other Events

.

The Arizona Republic-12 News Breaking News Team

Medical examiners on Thursday were working to identify at least two people who died after a small plane crashed near the runway at Casa Grande Municipal Airport on Wednesday morning.

It is still unclear how many people were in the Beechcraft King Air, a twin-engine turbo-prop plane, that crashed shortly after 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, just north of the runway.

The plane was destroyed by fire, said Jim Morgan, assistant fire chief of the Casa Grande Fire Department.

The charred remains of the two people were visible at the crash site. It is possible that more remains could be found in the crash, Morgan said.

The medical examiner is working to identify the bodies at this time.

An investigator from the National Transportation Safety Board was on the scene Thursday, and plans to have the wreckage removed to a Phoenix storage facility by the evening.

The investigator, alongside an investigator from the Federal Aviation Administration is scheduled to do a physical examination of the wreckage Friday.

The plane is registered to a Tuscon company, said Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

Additional information was being withheld until officials notify relatives of the deceased.

The National Transportation Safety Board will be the lead agency in the investigation, although it could take months to determine the cause of the crash, Gregor said.

The plane was flying from west to east as it began to land, Morgan said.

“The airplane made a sudden ascent and a sudden descent where it crashed,” Morgan said.

A firefighter working outside a nearby fire station told investigators that as the plane approached the runway, it went straight up about 200 to 300 feet, made a sharp left turn and crashed.

“It could have been what is known as a stall,’’ Morgan said.

One witness apparently saw the plane, which looked like a six-seater, try to land on the runway when it kicked up and flipped over. Gary Couch, a retiree, was at the airport having coffee with friends when he heard the crash and saw the aftermath.

“We saw a lot of black smoke and a lot of flames,” Couch said. “You just feel sorry for the people in the plane.”

Morgan said it’s been several years since an accident like this occurred in Casa Grande.

Officials said several flight schools around Phoenix use the airport for training. The airport is often used as a halfway point between Tuscon and Phoenix. It does not have a control tower, so instrument landing rules are in effect.

Instructors and their students often practice touch and go drills, where they land and take off without coming to a full stop.

Full story, here.

After an airplane crash there are a lot of questions. This is true regardless of whether the crash involves a private general aviation airplane or a commercial airline. A tragic reality of a plane crash is that often evidence and witnesses are lost in the crash itself.

We can help answer the questions that arise after a plane crash by acting quickly to gather important evidence that would otherwise be lost. We then assemble skilled aviation experts to examine the data so that the appropriate party can be held responsible.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law, please visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Second Alaska Airlines pilot in ten days passes out mid-flight

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

.

By, King 5 News

King 5 News Video

PORTLAND — An Alaska Airlines flight bound for Seattle was diverted to Portland late Thursday night after its pilot passed out.

Alaska Airlines spokesperson Bobbie Egan told KGW in Portland that this was the second time a pilot lost consciousness due to the flu in 10 days. A pilot also passed out on January 22nd on Flight 606 from Seattle to Las Vegas, she told the station.

Thursday’s Flight 473 was on its way from Los Angeles to Seattle.

The plane was on autopilot somewhere over Oregon when it happened. The first officer took over and diverted it to the nearest airport, which was Portland International Airport.

The plane landed safely around 9:00 p.m. Paramedics intercepted the plane on the runway and took the pilot to the hospital.

Alaska Airlines said the pilot passed out due to food poisoning or a flu-like virus. He has been flying for Alaska Airlines for 28 years. The co-pilot had 11 years of experience.

The Boeing 737-700 with 116 passengers and five crew members left Los Angeles about 6:30 p.m. Passengers didn’t arrive in Seattle until after 1 a.m.

Full story, via King5.com

See this story via The Aviation Herald, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew world wide, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.