Horizon DH8D at Calgary on Mar 23rd 2013, unsafe gear

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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By Simon Hradecky, via The Aviation Herald

A Horizon de Havilland Dash 8-400 on behalf of Alaska Airlines, registration N408QX performing flight QX-2118/AS-2118 from Seattle,WA (USA) to Calgary,AB (Canada) with 74 people on board, was on final approach to Calgary’s runway 10 when the crew selected the gear down, the left main gear however did not extend. The crew went around and entered a hold to run the relevant checklists, a manual gear extension was able to extend and lock all gear. The aircraft landed on runway 16 about 35 minutes after going around.

The Canadian TSB reported the aircraft vacated the runway onto taxiway C1 from where it was towed to the apron. A worn left main gear up lock had failed to release the gear.

Original source, here.

Brodkowitz Law represents injured passengers and flight crew worldwide, following aviation incidents and accidents.  Visit our website for more information or contact us for a free consultation.

United Airlines Flight 217 Diverts to Charlotte, Engine Problem

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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By Lee Ferrara, via AirNation.net

A United Airlines flight flying from Houston to LaGuardia last night diverted to Charlotte Douglas Airport due to an engine issue.

‘Officials say United flight 217 was heading to LaGuardia from Houston Sunday night when it had problems with an engine. The plane had to make an emergency landing at Charlotte Douglas.’

The plane landed safely last night, and United is reimbursing passengers for their hotel stays. There were no injuries.

The exact cause of the trouble has not been released.

The aircraft was an Airbus A320.

Original source, here.

Brodkowitz Law’s aviation practice has been nationally recognized. Our work representing plane crash victims, commercial airline passengers, pilots, flight attendants and helicopter crash victims has resulted in obtaining millions of dollars in compensation for injured clients.

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Plane from Baltimore makes emergency landing

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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Posted from ABC2news.com

By: WMAR Staff

INDIANAPOLIS - A plane flying non-stop from Baltimore to Las Vegas made an emergency landing in Indiana after there were reports of an electrical odor.

The plane was a Southwest airlines flight 441 and had 134 people on board.
The plane declared an emergency and landed in Indianapolis after reports of a smoky smell of an electrical nature were coming from inside the galley.
After flight 441 landed at 8:45 p.m., officials found no signs of any fire.
The plane was rescheduled to fly on to Las Vegas.  No injuries were reported.


Read more: http://www.abc2news.com/dpp/news/national/plane-from-baltimore-makes-emergency-landing#ixzz2OID9nInO

If you or someone you know are experiencing any health effects following exposure to contaminated air on an airplane from smoke or other sources, there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events. Bring this document to your doctor.

For more information of contaminated bleed air, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

“Just this weekend: nine fatalities in 11 small plane crashes nationwide”

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Crashes, Safety

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Original story: By (@JimAvilaABC) and (@SerenaMarsh)

via ABCNews.com

From original story:

Just this weekend, there were nine fatalities in 11 small plane crashes nationwide. A twin-engine jet crashed into a house in South Bend, Ind., killing two on Sunday. While a twin-engine turbo prop in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., killed three when it crashed into an auto pound.

NTSB chief Deborah Hersman told ABC News that 97 percent of aviation fatalities occur in general aviation, not commercial flights.

“The NTSB is so concerned with general aviation safety that we have placed this on our ‘most wanted’ list of transportation safety improvements,” Hersman said.

In fact, while domestic commercial airplanes are on a safety streak of no fatalities in more than three years, small planes average five accidents per day, accounting for nearly 500 American deaths in small planes each year.

Full story, with video, here.

On March 12, 2013 the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued Five Safety Alerts to Improve General Aviation Safety, the Press Release can be found, here. The Press Release states:

“Because we investigate each of the 1,500 GA accidents that occur in the United States every year, we see the same types of accidents over and over again,” said NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman. “What’s especially tragic is that so many of these accidents are entirely preventable.”

Each year, about 475 pilots and passengers are killed and hundreds more are seriously injured in GA accidents in the United States, which is why GA Safety is on the NTSB’s Most Wanted List. (http://go.usa.gov/28DF)

A Safety Alert is a brief information sheet that pinpoints a particular safety hazard and offers practical remedies to address the issue. Three of the Safety Alerts focus on topics related to some of the most common defining events for fatal GA accidents. These include low-altitude stalls, spatial disorientation and controlled flight into terrain, and mechanical problems. The other two Safety Alerts address risk mitigation.

The five Safety Alerts issued today (March 12, 2013) are:

  • Is Your Aircraft Talking to You? Listen!
  • Reduced Visual References Require Vigilance
  • Avoid Aerodynamic Stalls at Low Altitude
  • Mechanics: Manage Risks to Ensure Safety
  • Pilots: Manage Risks to Ensure Safety
Full NTSB Press Release, here.
After an airplane crash there are a lot of questions. This is true regardless of whether the crash involves a private general aviation airplane or a commercial airline. A tragic reality of a plane crash is that often evidence and witnesses are lost in the crash itself.
At Brodkowitz Law, we can help answer the questions that arise after a plane crash by acting quickly to gather important evidence that would otherwise be lost. We then assemble skilled aviation experts to examine the data so that the appropriate party can be held responsible. The next step is to decide where suit should be brought and which laws apply.
For more information, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Maui-Phoenix US Airways flight diverts to Honolulu

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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by, The Associated Press via CNBC,

HONOLULU — A US Airways flight from Maui to Phoenix diverted to Honolulu after crew members noticed a problem with one of the plane’s pressurization and air conditioning kits.

US Airways Group spokesman Todd Lehmacher said the redeye flight was less than halfway to Phoenix when its crew decided to be cautious and turn the plane around. It landed in Honolulu early Tuesday without incident. Nobody was hurt.

Lehmacher said the Boeing 757 had two kits, and one was malfunctioning.

Lehmacher says about half the plane’s 166 passengers will depart Tuesday night, while the other half were rebooked on other airlines.

Full story, here.

Additional information can be found at The Aviation Herald:

A US Airways Boeing 757-200, registration N909AW performing flight US-31 from Kahului,HI to Phoenix,AZ (USA) with 166 passengers, stopped the climb out of Kahului at FL290 and continued towards Phoenix until about 700nm (1.5 hours at speeds over ground in excess of 500 knots due to tailwinds) into the flight when the crew decided to return to Hawaii and to divert to Honolulu (speeds over ground at or less than 400 knots due to headwinds), where the aircraft landed safely about 3.5 hours after departure.

The airline reported the crew returned to Hawaii as a precaution when one of the two air conditioning packs in control of cabin pressure and air condition malfunctioned.

The incident aircraft positioned to Phoenix the following day as flight US-9206 and resumed service afterwards.

Full story, here.

Brodkowitz Law represents airline passengers who are injured due to airline negligence.  Every year airline passengers are injured when flying commercially.  When an aircraft does not pressurize normally passengers can suffer ruptured eardrums and loss of hearing.  If you are experiencing any health effects following a flight, please do not hesitate to be seen by a medical doctor.

If you would like more information, please visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

1 killed, 1 injured as plane crashes into home near Woodinville

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Crashes

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By KOMO Staff, via Komonews.com

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WOODINVILLE, Wash. - A small plane crashed into a home Saturday near Woodinville, killing the pilot and critically injuring a passenger aboard the aircraft, police said.

Firefighters and police responded to the scene, near NE 144th Street and 232rd Avenue NE, at about 3 p.m. after receiving a report of a plane crash into a single-family home.

Two people were aboard the plane. The pilot, Jay Uusitalo, 45, of Redmond, was found dead at the scene.

The passenger, a teen from Eastern Washington who is Uusitalo’s nephew, was rushed to Harborview Medical Center with severe lacerations to the head and chest, as well as internal injuries. He initially was listed in critical condition, but was upgraded to serious on Saturday.

Two teenage boys were inside the home at the time, only feet away from the spot where the plane crashed.

In an interview, they said they heard a loud crash and the whole house shook. They then saw the wing of a plane inside the home.

“I was sitting in my house, and I hear a loud bang. And I - like thunder - I was thinking thunder,” said one of the teens. “I look outside, and I look down, and there’s the wing right down below it, below the window. And I was right there, too. I didn’t realize how close it was to hitting me.”

Other witnesses who live in the neighborhood say they heard sputtering and looked up. They saw the propeller on the plane stop and the aircraft flipped upside down, crashing into the home.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration registry, the fixed-wing single engine plane is registered in Redmond and it seats up to four people.

It was not immediately known where the plane was coming from or where it was headed.

The FAA, National Transportation Safety Board and the King County Sheriff’s Office are all investigating the crash.

The plane’s wreckage likely will not be removed until Sunday, officials said.

Full story and video, here.

A follow up story can be found, here.

After an airplane crash there are a lot of questions. This is true regardless of whether the crash involves a private general aviation airplane or a commercial airline. A tragic reality of a plane crash is that often evidence and witnesses are lost in the crash itself.

We can help answer the questions that arise after a plane crash by acting quickly to gather important evidence that would otherwise be lost. We then assemble skilled aviation experts to examine the data so that the appropriate party can be held responsible. The next step is to decide where suit should be brought and which laws apply.

For more information, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

FAA: Boeing should inspect for cracks on 747s

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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Story by, Bart Jansen, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing additional inspections for Boeing’s 747s because of the risk that cracks around a rear door could cause the planes to depressurize in flight.

Boeing agrees with the proposal, which the company already had recommended to airlines and which FAA is publishing Wednesday in the Federal Register.

The proposal calls for additional inspections every 3,000 flights on various models totaling about 150 planes. Each round of extra inspection is projected to cost $1.5 million.

“This (proposal) was prompted by multiple reports of cracking outside of the previous inspection areas,” the FAA’s 17-page announcement says. “We are issuing this (proposal) to detect and correct such cracks, which could cause damage to the adjacent body structure and could result in a rapid depressurization of the airplane.”

No such incidents were cited in the proposal called an air worthiness directive.

The proposal affects 747 models 100, 100B, 100B SUD, 200B, 200C, 200F 300, 400, 400D, 400F and SR. The added inspections are aimed at finding and fixing cracks in supports for the fuselage around main door five in the rear of the plane.

Kate Bergman, a Boeing spokeswoman, says the company continuously monitors inspection reports to ensure the highest level of safety for the world’s jetliners. She said the FAA proposal would mandate what Boeing already recommended to airlines.

“Boeing’s recommendations are not binding on operators,” Bergman says. “Only a regulator agency has the authority to require them. That is what the FAA’s proposed rule would do.”

In January. the FAA ordered more inspections of 737s because sections of the roof came off two planes in flight, which depressurized the cabins and forced emergency landings.

But those two incidents involved different joints rupturing, and the company says they are unrelated to the 747 problem.

“This in no way resembles the crown skin cracking experienced by some 737s,” Bergman says.

Full story, here.

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Three dead after plane crash near Iditarod checkpoint

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Crashes

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By Yereth Rosen, Reuters, via NBCnews.com

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A small plane crashed near a mountain checkpoint along the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, killing all three people aboard, state officials said on Tuesday.

Searchers found wreckage of the plane, a Cessna 182, on Tuesday near the 4,000-foot level of Rainy Pass in the Alaska Range north of Anchorage.

Rainy Pass is one of the early checkpoints in the 1,000-mile Iditarod, which began in Anchorage on Saturday.

The search began late on Monday when the plane was reported missing, the Alaska National Guard said. It failed to reach its destination of Takotna, an Athabascan village that serves as a race checkpoint 176 miles beyond Rainy Pass.

Killed were pilot Ted Smith, 59, a retired Anchorage police officer, and passengers Carolyn Sorvoja, 48, and Rosemarie Sorvoja, 10, the Alaska State Troopers said. All were from Eagle River.

The plane and those aboard were not part of the “Iditarod Air Force,” the group of volunteer pilots who ferry supplies and race officials to checkpoints and take dropped dogs back to Anchorage, said a race spokeswoman.

“All our pilots and all our folks are accounted for,” Iditarod spokeswoman Erin McLarnon said.

But skies above the Iditarod Trail are typically busy during the race with numerous other small aircraft carrying spectators.

It was unclear whether the crash victims were following the Iditarod, said Megan Peters, a spokeswoman for the Alaska State Troopers said. She said the two females were mother and daughter.

The wreckage was found by an Air National Guard helicopter crew. The victims’ bodies were recovered, and an investigation into the crash has been launched, Alaska National Guard officials said.

Full story, here.

After an airplane crash there are a lot of questions. This is true regardless of whether the crash involves a private general aviation airplane or a commercial airline. A tragic reality of a plane crash is that often evidence and witnesses are lost in the crash itself.

For more information, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

US Airways A321 near Phoenix on Mar 4th 2013, fumes on board

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Fumes

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By Simon Hradecky, created Monday, Mar 4th 2013

via The Aviation Herald

A US Airways Airbus A321-200, registration N559UW performing positioning flight US-9010 from Las Vegas,NV to Charlotte,NC (USA) with 7 crew, was enroute at FL390 about 180nm northeast of Phoenix,AZ when the crew reported fumes on board and decided to divert to Phoenix. Phoenix Airport started to quarantine the runway for the arrival sending all arriving traffic into holds and stopping departures, but resumed arrivals and departures prior to landing of N554UW. The aircraft landed safely on runway 26 about 30 minutes after leaving FL390. All crew were medically checked at the airport but did not need treatment.

The airline said the cause of the fumes is under investigation.

Story via The Aviation Herald, here.

Additional information can be found, here.

If you have been exposed to contaminated air on an airplane there is important information that your doctor should know. Click here to obtain the Bleed Air Medical Protocol, a document designed to help doctors treat victims of fume events. Bring this document to your doctor.

For more information, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.