Federal Aviation Administration Press Release

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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For Immediate Release

January 31, 2014
Contact: Kristie Greco
Phone: (202) 267-3883


WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today announced that India has been assigned a Category 2 rating under its International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) program, based on a recent reassessment of the country’s civil aviation authority.  This signifies that India’s civil aviation safety oversight regime does not currently comply with the international safety standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO); however, the United States will continue to work with India’s Directorate General for Civil Aviation (DGCA) to identify the remaining steps necessary to regain Category 1 status for India. With a Category 2 rating, India’s carriers can continue existing service to the United States, but will not be allowed to establish new service to the United States.

India achieved a Category 1 rating, signifying compliance with ICAO standards, in August 1997.  A December 2012 ICAO audit identified deficiencies in the ICAO-set global standards for oversight of aviation safety by India’s Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA).  Subsequently, the FAA began a reassessment of India’s compliance with ICAO standards under the FAA’s IASA program, which monitors adherence to international safety standards and practices.  The FAA has consulted extensively with the DCGA and other relevant Indian government ministries during its evaluation, including consultations in India in September and early December, and meetings this week in Delhi.

“U.S. and Indian aviation officials have developed an important working relationship as our countries work to meet the challenges of ensuring international aviation safety. The FAA is available to work with the Directorate General of Civil Aviation to help India regain its Category 1 rating,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta.

The Government of India has made significant progress towards addressing issues identified during the September 2013 IASA assessment. On January 20, the Government of India took further steps to resolve outstanding issues when the Indian Cabinet approved the hiring of 75 additional full-time inspectors.  The United States Government commends the Indian government for taking these important actions, and looks forward to continued progress by Indian authorities to comply with internationally mandated aviation safety oversight standards.

Additional Background on the FAA’s IASA Program:
As part of the FAA’s IASA program, the agency assesses on a uniform basis the civil aviation authorities of all countries with air carriers that operate or have applied to operate to the United States and makes that information available to the public. The assessments determine whether or not foreign civil aviation authorities are meeting ICAO safety standards, not FAA regulations.

A Category 2 rating means a country either lacks laws or regulations necessary to oversee air carriers in accordance with minimum international standards, or that its civil aviation authority – equivalent to the FAA for aviation safety matters – is deficient in one or more areas, such as technical expertise, trained personnel, record-keeping or inspection procedures.

Countries with air carriers that fly to the United States must adhere to the safety standards of ICAO, the United Nations’ technical agency for aviation that establishes international standards and recommended practices for aircraft operations and maintenance. IASA information is at www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/iasa/.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work holding an airlines accountable for injuries to passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us.

Republic E175 at Chicago on Jan 27th 2014, GPU exploded

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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via Simon Hradecky, The Aviation Herald

A Republic Airways Embraer ERJ-175 on behalf of American Airlines, registration N406YX performing flight YX-4309/AA-4309 from Washington National,DC to Chicago O’Hare,IL (USA), had safely landed in Chicago and docket at the gate, when a ground power unit (GPU) was connected but exploded in a fireball. The crew decided to evacuate the aircraft via slides. Two passengers received minor injuries in the evacuation.

The FAA reported a GPU exploded in a fireball when the aircraft docked at the gate in Chicago, two passengers received minor injuries, there was no damage to the aircraft.

Original source, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us.

Plane crashes in Snohomish lake, 2 aboard OK

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Crashes, Safety

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Via Seattlepi.com

EVERETT, Wash. (AP) — Authorities say a plane crashed in a Snohomish County lake and the two people aboard have been left cold and shaken up but otherwise OK.

The Sheriff’s Office says witnesses reported the crash around 4:30 p.m. Sunday in Lake Goodwin, about 10 miles north of Everett.

The two occupants were in the water a short period of time before being picked up by a resident and taken to shore.

The office says the pilot is 51, but did not provide any other identifying details.

It says the aircraft involved is a float plane with a boat hull.

Authorities say any potential environmental issues related to the crash are under investigation.

There was no immediate word on what caused the crash.

Original story, here.

Preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration can be found, here. This information is generally available for ten days. No information is available yet from the National Transportation Safety Board.

After an airplane crash there are a lot of questions. Often the pilot is blamed for the crash when it fact, he or she did absolutely everything in their power to avoid it. In such cases the real cause of a crash may remain hidden forever without the help of an aviation attorney and accident investigator or reconstructionist.

We can help answer the questions that arise after a plane crash by acting quickly to gather important evidence that would otherwise be lost. We then assemble skilled aviation experts to examine the data so that the appropriate party can be held responsible.

For more information, contact Brodkowitz Law.

Air Canada A320 near Thunder Bay on Jan 20th 2014, wake turbulence enroute rolls the aircraft to 40 degrees

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Other Events, Safety, Turbulence

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via AeroInside

An Air Canada Airbus A320-200, registration C-FKCK performing flight AC-263 from Toronto,ON to Winnipeg,MB (Canada) with 133 people on board, was enroute at FL360 near Thunder Bay,ON (Canada) in 45 degrees cross winds when the crew reported the aircraft had unexpectedly and uncommandedly rolled left to 40 degrees of bank. The crew stabilized the aircraft and continued to Winnipeg for a safe landing.

The Canadian TSB reported the aircraft was trailing flight AC-121 from Toronto to Calgary,AB (Canada) flown by a Boeing 777-300 registration C-FIUL with the required separation between the aircraft. The Airbus experienced wake turbulence from the Boeing.

Full story: here.

At Brodkowitz Law, we represent airline passengers who are injured due to airline negligence.  Every year airline passengers are injured when flying commercially.  Turbulence injuries are another common occurrence.  Many of these injuries are preventable.

For more information, visit our website or contact us.

Delta B752 near Fort Lauderdale on Jan 20th 2014, loss of cabin pressure

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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By Simon Hradecky, via The Aviation Herald

A Delta Airlines Boeing 757-200, registration N623DL performing flight DL-902 from San Jose (Costa Rica) to Atlanta,GA (USA), was enroute south of Florida when the crew needed to initiate an emergency descent to 10,000 feet due to the loss of cabin pressure. The aircraft subsequently diverted to Fort Lauderdale, FL (USA) for a safe landing.

A replacement Boeing 757-200 reached Atlanta with a delay of 12 hours.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/DAL902/history/20140120/1430Z/MROC/KATL

Original source: here.

Every year airline passengers are injured when flying commercially.  When an aircraft does not pressurize normally passengers suffer ruptured eardrums and loss of hearing. At Brodkowitz Law we have obtained settlements from airlines for these types of injuries.  For more information visit our Settlements page or contact us for a free consultation.

Severe Turbulence Forces Flight to Return to Newark

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Other Events

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A passenger describes it as the worst turbulence he’s ever experienced

By Ida Siegal - via NBCNewYork.com

A flight leaving Newark Airport turned around shortly after takeoff when it experienced severe turbulence, hurting five flight attendants, officials say.

United Airlines Flight 89, bound for Beijing, returned about 45 minutes after it departed the airport, according to the Port Authority.

Passenger Bryan Munoz, a frequent air traveler, told NBC 4 New York it was the worst turbulence he had ever experienced. Everything started shaking just as the flight attendants had gotten up to start serving passengers, he said.

“It was really fast, sudden,” Munoz said. “We lost a little bit of altitude and the plane went side to side. It was a bit nerve-wracking.”

While brief — the turbulence lasted about 30 seconds, according to Munoz — it was intense enough that the attendants were visibly hurt. One was holding her arm and wrist after the episode, and another was limping, Munoz said.

There were 189 passengers and 16 crew members on board, according to the airline.

After landing, five flight attendants were treated for minor injuries, mainly bumps and bruises. No passengers were injured, officials said.

The passengers were re-booked for another flight Friday morning.

The FAA says it is investigating.

Full story and video report, here via NBCNewYork.com.

At Brodkowitz Law, we represent airline passengers who are injured due to negligence.  Every year airline passengers are injured when flying commercially. Turbulence injuries are a common occurrence.  For more information, contact us.

Westjet B737 near Rapid City on Jan 10th 2014, loss of cabin pressure

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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By Simon Hradecky, The Aviation Herald

A Westjet Boeing 737-700, registration C-FWAD performing flight WS-1343 from Phoenix,AZ (USA) to Winnipeg,MB (Canada) with 38 passengers and 5 crew, was enroute at FL410 about 100nm southwest of Denver,CO (USA) when the #2 bleed air tripped off. The crew successfully reset the bleed air system, however, 10 minutes later 50nm north of Denver the #2 bleed air system tripped again and was shut down. Another 15 minutes later, about 150nm northnortheast of Denver and 130nm south of Rapid City,SD (USA), the #1 bleed air system tripped too, the cabin began to “climb” at 2000 to 3000 feet per minute. The crew donned their oxygen masks, executed a rapid depressurization causing the passenger oxygen masks to be released and initiated an emergency descent to 10,000 feet. The crew decided to divert to Rapid City where the aircraft landed safely about 32 minutes after leaving FL410.

The Canadian TSB reported that the bleed air system #2 tripped a second time about 10 minutes after the successful reset, about 15 minutes after the #2 bleed air system tripped off the second time the #1 bleed air system tripped as well resulting the in cabin climbing at about 2000-3000 feet per minute, the crew donned their oxygen masks and performed a rapid depressurization, an emergency descent and diversion to Rapid City. In the meantime the aircraft has been ferried to Toronto,ON (Canada) for examination and repair.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/WJA1343/history/20140111/0305Z/KPHX/CYWG

Full story via The Aviation Herald, here.

At Brodkowitz Law we represent airline passengers who are injured due to airline negligence.  When an aircraft does not pressurize normally passengers suffer ruptured eardrums and loss of hearing.  If you have been injured on an airplane, contact us for more information.

Questions abound after plane lands at wrong airport

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Safety

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By Ashley Fantz and Ed Payne, CNN

(CNN) —  A day after Southwest Airlines landed a jet with 124 passengers at the wrong airport, many are asking: How in the world could that happen?

“It’s not common, but it’s not unheard of,” said pilot Mark Weiss, a 20-year veteran of commercial aviation who has frequently flown Boeing 737-700s, the same kind of aircraft that touched down Sunday at a small airport in Taney County, Missouri, about seven miles from where it was supposed to land at Branson Airport.

The plane landed about 500 feet from the end of a runway at M. Graham Clark Downtown Airport, but no one was injured, said Chris Berndt, the Western Taney County Fire District fire chief and emergency management director.

“There are a lot of questions, and I suspect this is a matter of procedures not being followed, something along the long chain of everything you must do and constantly do as a pilot for safety,” Weiss said.

But that’s little consolation for passengers shaken by the experience.

“Really happy (the) pilot applied brakes the way he did,” said passenger Scott Schieffer. “Who knows what would have happened?”

The airport’s runway is 3,738 feet, about half the length of the Branson Airport runway, which is 7,140.

That forced pilots to act fast and brake hard when the aircraft touched down.

If they had not, the plane could have overshot the end of the runway, tumbled down an embankment and onto U.S. Highway 65.

The pilots have been removed from flying duty, pending an investigation, Southwest said Monday afternoon. Both pilots have been flying with Southwest for more than 13 years, according to spokeswoman Brandy King.

Apology following landing announcement

Passenger Schieffer told CNN the flight had been late in departing Chicago’s Midway International Airport on Sunday afternoon but nothing seemed amiss.

But as the plane touched down on the runway, Schieffer heard and felt the brakes hit hard and smelled rubber burning.

It was “one of the hardest landings I ever experienced,” he told CNN.

Kevin Riley, who lives near the airport, said he was sitting in his living room when he heard the landing.

“I thought it was a military plane because it’s so loud,” he said. “This airport takes small planes … nothing to the level or volume of that plane.”

“Welcome to Branson,” the pilot announced, Schieffer recalled. A few minutes later, the pilot came back on.

“I’m sorry, ladies and gentlemen, we have landed at the wrong airport,” he said, according to Schieffer.

He then repeatedly apologized to passengers who were stuck on the tarmac for two hours while steps could be brought over from Branson Airport to help them deplane.

The pilots declined to talk about what happened as they left the plane, Berndt said.

While waiting, Schieffer and the other passengers ate peanuts provided by flight attendants. Southwest offered them a $200 travel voucher, he said.

Full story with video report, here.

The Aviation Herald provides additional information about the flight, here.

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew world wide, visit our website or contact us for a free evaluation.

Water pipe bursts aboard Baltimore-bound flight

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Other Events, Safety

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. —A water pipe burst on board a flight from Dallas to Baltimore, prompting an emergency landing in Arkansas Tuesday evening.

An American Airlines official said Flight 1106 from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport to Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport was diverted to Little Rock after a lavatory water pipe burst.

The flight landed without further incident and the airline’s maintenance team was evaluating the aircraft, an MD-80 with 140 passengers and a crew of five.

An NBC News producer aboard the flight said the break sent water throughout the plane, and that the pilot attributed the break to extreme cold weather conditions. Following repairs, the passengers were to be put back on the plane with bottled water.

Read more: http://www.wbaltv.com/news/maryland/water-pipe-bursts-aboard-baltimorebound-flight/-/9379376/23820454/-/tsau24z/-/index.html#ixzz2ppkPJcaD

For more information about Brodkowitz Law and our work representing injured passengers and flight crew worldwide, visit our website or contact us for a free consultation.

Plane crash at Shaw airport

Author: Alisa Brodkowitz  |  Category: Crashes, Safety

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via San Juan Islander

A plane crashed  while attempting to land at  the Shaw Island airport around 4:15 p.m.  Friday, January 3. A man, the only person onboard, was injured and  airlifted to PeaceHealth Hospital in Bellingham.

Shaw Island Emergency personnel responded to the crash. Sheriff deputies from Orcas Island went to the island to assist.

Original source, here.

The Federal Aviation Administration reports:

Regis#: N5484U
Aircraft Make: DE HAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DHC2

AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO THE TREES UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, WILDING FARM AIRPORT, SHAW ISLAND, WA

FAA Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) Notices, can be found, here.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has not yet issued a Preliminary Report, however, that information can be found here, as soon as it is available.

At Brodkowitz Law, we can help answer the questions that arise after a plane crash by acting quickly to gather important evidence that would otherwise be lost. We then assemble skilled aviation experts to examine the data so that the appropriate party can be held responsible.

For more information, visit our website or contact us.